Feingold will vote 'no' on Wall Street bill

The move raises pressure on Senate Democrats to win the votes of Sen. Maria CantwellMaria Elaine CantwellDemocrats oppose effort to delay or repeal Interior methane rule Senators spar over proposal to drill in Alaska wildlife refuge Fake quorum calls are an excuse for the Senate's inaction MORE (D-Wash.) and a handful of Senate Republicans.

Senate Democrats aim to pass the Wall Street overhaul bill this week, but the passing of Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.) has given them little room to negotiate votes. House and Senate lawmakers finalized the legislation in a conference process early Friday morning.

"As I have indicated for some time now, my test for the financial regulatory reform bill is whether it will prevent another crisis," Feingold said in a statement. "The conference committee's proposal fails that test and for that reason I will not vote to advance it."

Feingold and Cantwell voted against ending debate on the bill in May and against the overall bill. Democrats were able to advance the legislation with the help of Republican Sens. Scott Brown (Mass.), Olympia Snowe (Maine) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsBipartisan group of lawmakers aim to reform US sugar program A bipartisan bridge opens between the House and Senate Gaming the odds of any GOP tax bill getting signed into law MORE (Maine).

Brown has expressed disappointment at the final bill that passed through the conference committee. If he votes against the legislation in the Senate, Democrats will need to hold the rest of the votes they had in May and swing either Cantwell or another Republican to advance the bill.

Collins is reviewing the legislation, according to her office, and has not firmly committed to back the bill.

Sen. Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleySenators push mandatory sexual harassment training for members, staff Senate panel to hold hearing on bump stocks, background checks Senate panel to hold hearing on bump stocks MORE (R-Iowa) voted for the underlying legislation in May, but voted against cutting off debate.