Reid pulls back from yearlong omnibus, aims for short-term funding resolution

Without an agreement in hand, Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidCharles Koch thanks Harry Reid for helping his book sales Warren cautions Dems against infighting Dems see surge of new candidates MORE (D-Nev.) said he'd work to complete a short-term continuing resolution instead of a yearlong bill, which would run through the fiscal year Sept. 30, before the current funding expires Saturday night. 

Reid decided he wouldn't file cloture on a $1.108 trillion yearlong omnibus spending bill on Thursday night after realizing he didn't have the votes. 

Reid said he had the backing of nine Republicans on the measure but had they defected, leaving the measure short of the support needed to move forward. He said he would work with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellGOP senator: Don't expect Trump to 'have your back' on healthcare vote Senate Dems step up protests ahead of ObamaCare repeal vote Johnson becomes fourth GOP senator unwilling to proceed on healthcare bill MORE (R-Ky.) on a bill that can pass the chamber before time runs out Saturday. 

He questioned why Republicans would want to cede spending power to the executive branch. 

Senate Democrats — Appropriations panel members Sen. Patty MurrayPatty MurrayDems push for more action on power grid cybersecurity Live coverage: Senate GOP unveils its ObamaCare repeal bill Senators grill Perry on Yucca nuclear storage plans MORE (Wash.) and Dick DurbinDick DurbinSenate Dems set principles for potential budget negotiation Dem senator: GOP's healthcare approach will 'devastate Medicaid' Sunday shows preview: Senate healthcare debate heats up MORE (Ill.) — said they worked with their respective Republican counterparts in putting together the measure and expressed surprise that Republicans were refusing to take up the measure. 

Durbin said the price tag on the bill matches the level requested by McConnell and that the Democratic and Republican subcommittee leaders sat down and compromised on the larger package's details. 

McConnell argued that while he recognized the Appropriations committee's work on the measure, he said the bill needed more consideration on the Senate floor. 

During the past couple of days, Senate Republicans and Democrats had sparred over $8 billion in earmarks in the bill. Several Republicans, including John CornynJohn CornynSenate adds penalty for going uninsured to healthcare bill The Hill's 12:30 Report Cornyn: GOP won't delay ObamaCare repeal vote MORE (Texas) and John ThuneJohn ThuneFour GOP senators will vote against taking up healthcare bill without changes Week ahead in tech: Lawmakers turn focus to self-driving cars Senate panel unveils aviation bill with consumer protections, drone fix MORE (S.D.) have tried to argue around their opposition to earmarks while authoring some of those included in the bill.