Reid pulls back from yearlong omnibus, aims for short-term funding resolution

Without an agreement in hand, Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidAmendments fuel resentments within Senate GOP Donald Trump is delivering on his promises and voters are noticing Danny Tarkanian wins Nevada GOP congressional primary MORE (D-Nev.) said he'd work to complete a short-term continuing resolution instead of a yearlong bill, which would run through the fiscal year Sept. 30, before the current funding expires Saturday night. 

Reid decided he wouldn't file cloture on a $1.108 trillion yearlong omnibus spending bill on Thursday night after realizing he didn't have the votes. 

Reid said he had the backing of nine Republicans on the measure but had they defected, leaving the measure short of the support needed to move forward. He said he would work with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellWarren on family separation policy: Trump is ‘taking America to a dark and ugly place’ Senate GOP tries to defuse Trump border crisis Schumer rejects GOP proposal to address border crisis MORE (R-Ky.) on a bill that can pass the chamber before time runs out Saturday. 

He questioned why Republicans would want to cede spending power to the executive branch. 

Senate Democrats — Appropriations panel members Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayIBM-led coalition pushes senators for action on better tech skills training Members of Congress demand new federal gender pay audit Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — Health chief grilled on Trump drug pricing plan, ObamaCare case MORE (Wash.) and Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinLive coverage: FBI chief, Justice IG testify on critical report Hugh Hewitt to Trump: 'It is 100 percent wrong to separate border-crossing families' Opioid treatment plans must include a trauma-informed approach MORE (Ill.) — said they worked with their respective Republican counterparts in putting together the measure and expressed surprise that Republicans were refusing to take up the measure. 

Durbin said the price tag on the bill matches the level requested by McConnell and that the Democratic and Republican subcommittee leaders sat down and compromised on the larger package's details. 

McConnell argued that while he recognized the Appropriations committee's work on the measure, he said the bill needed more consideration on the Senate floor. 

During the past couple of days, Senate Republicans and Democrats had sparred over $8 billion in earmarks in the bill. Several Republicans, including John CornynJohn CornynGOP senators introduce bill to prevent family separations at border Senate GOP tries to defuse Trump border crisis Dem plays audio from child detention center on Senate floor MORE (Texas) and John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneStop labeling babies as 'born addicted' — it stigmatizes them and is inaccurate Trump plan to claw back billion in spending in peril McConnell: Mueller 'ought to wrap it up' MORE (S.D.) have tried to argue around their opposition to earmarks while authoring some of those included in the bill.