Reid pulls back from yearlong omnibus, aims for short-term funding resolution

Without an agreement in hand, Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidOPINION | 5 ways Democrats can win back power in the states THE MEMO: Trump's base cheers attacks on McConnell It's time for McConnell to fight with Trump instead of against him MORE (D-Nev.) said he'd work to complete a short-term continuing resolution instead of a yearlong bill, which would run through the fiscal year Sept. 30, before the current funding expires Saturday night. 

Reid decided he wouldn't file cloture on a $1.108 trillion yearlong omnibus spending bill on Thursday night after realizing he didn't have the votes. 

Reid said he had the backing of nine Republicans on the measure but had they defected, leaving the measure short of the support needed to move forward. He said he would work with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellTrump’s isolation grows Ellison: Trump has 'level of sympathy' for neo-Nazis, white supremacists Trump touts endorsement of second-place finisher in Alabama primary MORE (R-Ky.) on a bill that can pass the chamber before time runs out Saturday. 

He questioned why Republicans would want to cede spending power to the executive branch. 

Senate Democrats — Appropriations panel members Sen. Patty MurrayPatty MurrayCBO to release report Tuesday on ending ObamaCare insurer payments OPINION | Progressives, now's your chance to secure healthcare for all McConnell open to bipartisan deal on health insurance payments MORE (Wash.) and Richard DurbinDick DurbinOPINION | DACA helps people achieve the American dream, don't take it away Immigration battlefield widens for Trump, GOP 'Dreamers' deadline looms for Trump MORE (Ill.) — said they worked with their respective Republican counterparts in putting together the measure and expressed surprise that Republicans were refusing to take up the measure. 

Durbin said the price tag on the bill matches the level requested by McConnell and that the Democratic and Republican subcommittee leaders sat down and compromised on the larger package's details. 

McConnell argued that while he recognized the Appropriations committee's work on the measure, he said the bill needed more consideration on the Senate floor. 

During the past couple of days, Senate Republicans and Democrats had sparred over $8 billion in earmarks in the bill. Several Republicans, including John CornynJohn CornynImmigration battlefield widens for Trump, GOP Congressional investigations — not just special counsels — strengthen our democracy Wrath of right falls on Google MORE (Texas) and John ThuneJohn ThuneWaymo taps Senate Commerce staffer for government affairs team Billboard ads target Republicans who want to roll back net neutrality GOP debates tax cuts vs. tax reform MORE (S.D.) have tried to argue around their opposition to earmarks while authoring some of those included in the bill.