Reid pulls back from yearlong omnibus, aims for short-term funding resolution

Without an agreement in hand, Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidTrump presses GOP to change Senate rules Only thing Defense’s UFO probe proves is power of political favors Nevada Democrat accused of sexual harassment reconsiders retirement: report MORE (D-Nev.) said he'd work to complete a short-term continuing resolution instead of a yearlong bill, which would run through the fiscal year Sept. 30, before the current funding expires Saturday night. 

Reid decided he wouldn't file cloture on a $1.108 trillion yearlong omnibus spending bill on Thursday night after realizing he didn't have the votes. 

Reid said he had the backing of nine Republicans on the measure but had they defected, leaving the measure short of the support needed to move forward. He said he would work with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate tees up Yemen vote for Tuesday Senate confirms Trump's border chief House leaves out ObamaCare fix from must-pass funding bill MORE (R-Ky.) on a bill that can pass the chamber before time runs out Saturday. 

He questioned why Republicans would want to cede spending power to the executive branch. 

Senate Democrats — Appropriations panel members Sen. Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayLiberals seek ouster of HHS official blocking abortions CBO: Bill to shore up ObamaCare would reduce premiums by 10 percent Congress must stabilize the ACA to stabilize small businesses MORE (Wash.) and Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinTrump vows tougher borders to fight opioid epidemic Clinton: 'I meant no disrespect' with Trump voter comments Lawmakers rally to defend Mueller after McCabe exit MORE (Ill.) — said they worked with their respective Republican counterparts in putting together the measure and expressed surprise that Republicans were refusing to take up the measure. 

Durbin said the price tag on the bill matches the level requested by McConnell and that the Democratic and Republican subcommittee leaders sat down and compromised on the larger package's details. 

McConnell argued that while he recognized the Appropriations committee's work on the measure, he said the bill needed more consideration on the Senate floor. 

During the past couple of days, Senate Republicans and Democrats had sparred over $8 billion in earmarks in the bill. Several Republicans, including John CornynJohn CornynTrump adds to legal team after attacks on Mueller Senate tees up Yemen vote for Tuesday Senate GOP: Legislation to protect Mueller not needed MORE (Texas) and John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneSenate Commerce presses Facebook, Cambridge Analytic for answers on data Overnight Tech: Facebook faces crisis over Cambridge Analytica data | Lawmakers demand answers | What to watch for next | Day one of AT&T's merger trial | Self-driving Uber car kills pedestrian White House, Democrats reject competing DACA offers MORE (S.D.) have tried to argue around their opposition to earmarks while authoring some of those included in the bill.