Republican senators demand spending cuts of 'no less' than $100 billion

Republican senators demand spending cuts of 'no less' than $100 billion

Nearly a dozen Republican senators sent a letter on Friday urging the House to make at least $100 billion in spending cuts this year. 

In a letter to Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerTea Party favorite to lead conservative think tank Chaffetz calls for ,500 legislator housing stipend GOP super-PAC promises big spending in 2018 MORE (R-Ohio), the Republican senators said the American people expect that level of spending reductions from the new GOP majority.

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"Since the Democrats still control the Senate, we need the House-passed [continuing resolution] to be as bold as possible in order to strengthen the hand of Senate conservatives in increasing or maintaining the spending reductions," the letter said. 

"We believe that, as part of the urgent need to cut federal spending, the total value of the fiscal year 2011 spending reductions in the upcoming continuing resolution should be no less than $100 billion," the senators said in the letter.

The senators noted in the letter that a cut of $100 billion would be only "one-15th" of this year's budget deficit.


The letter was signed by a group of reliably fiscal conservatives, including five newly sworn-in senators: Ron JohnsonRon JohnsonHealthcare wish lists: What moderates, conservatives want Overnight Healthcare: GOP infighting erupts over bill | How Republican governors could bring down ObamaCare repeal | Schumer asks Trump to meet with Dems GOP infighting erupts over healthcare bill MORE of Wisconsin, Mike LeeMike LeeMedicaid becomes big threat to GOP’s healthcare revival Healthcare wish lists: What moderates, conservatives want GOP infighting erupts over healthcare bill MORE of Utah, Rand PaulRand PaulHealthcare wish lists: What moderates, conservatives want GOP infighting erupts over healthcare bill GOP senator on resolving healthcare differences: 'Even porcupines make love' MORE of Kentucky, Marco RubioMarco RubioCapitol Police arrest 40 during healthcare protests New Alexandra Pelosi documentary brings together GOP, Dem members Senators urge Trump to do right thing with arms sales to Taiwan MORE of Florida and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania. Sens. Demint of South Carolina, Tom CoburnTom Coburn'Path of least resistance' problematic for Congress Freedom Caucus saved Paul Ryan's job: GOP has promises to keep Don't be fooled: Carper and Norton don't fight for DC MORE of Oklahoma, John Ensign of Nevada, Mike EnziMike EnziRift opens in GOP over budget strategy GOP chairman wants 'robust' tax reform process in the Senate Congress needs to support the COINS Act MORE of Wyoming, Mike JohannsMike JohannsLobbying World To buy a Swiss company, ChemChina must pass through Washington Republican senator vows to block nominees over ObamaCare co-ops MORE of Nebraska and David VitterDavid VitterOvernight Energy: Trump set to propose sharp cuts to EPA, energy spending Former La. official tapped as lead offshore drilling regulator Former senator who crafted chemicals law to lobby for chemicals industry MORE of Louisiana also attached their name to the letter.

On Thursday, House Budget Chairman Paul RyanPaul RyanTea Party favorite to lead conservative think tank Unresolved issues, very little time for Senate GOP Tougher Russia sanctions bill facing another setback MORE (R-Wis.), who was given unilateral authority to set spending limits, said he would cap total appropriations at $1.055 trillion. That's $74 billion less than the budget request President Obama submitted to Congress for fiscal 2011 and $32 billion less than the level at which lawmakers agreed to maintain spending.

House Republicans had said during last year’s midterm campaign that they would make $100 billion in cuts, but top lawmakers had announced they would not hit that mark because the figure was based on President Obama's budget request for fiscal 2011, which was never enacted.

The Republican Study Committee, a group of conservative House members, have said that they still wanted the chamber to make $100 billion in spending reductions. Other House Republicans, including Rep. Jeff FlakeJeff FlakeOPINION: ObamaCare by another name is still ObamaCare Senate should seek to retain its 'blue slip' tradition for judicial nominees Progressives target Heller and Flake on Senate GOP bill MORE (R-Ariz.), are also pressing for deeper cuts. 

Paul, meanwhile, said on Friday that the $32 billion in cuts is “really not going to touch the problem” and has proposed decreasing spending by $500 billion.