Bernie Sanders to Obama: Keep your word on Social Security

Other liberal senators, like Ohio's Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod BrownAuthor of Hillbilly Elegy encouraged to run for Senate: report Overnight Finance: Trump moves to begin NAFTA talks | Dems press Treasury chief on taxes, Dodd-Frank | Biz leaders want tax changes to be permanent Mnuchin mum as Dems press for answers on tax reform, Dodd-Frank MORE, have criticized the president for considering changes to Medicare.

But in all, Democrats aren’t exactly on the same page as to what is currently on the table in the debt talks, which have an aim of reaching a deal that would allow Congress to raise the debt ceiling by Aug. 2.

On Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidGOP frustrated by slow pace of Trump staffing This week: Congress awaits Comey testimony Will Republicans grow a spine and restore democracy? MORE (D-Nev.) said he was only willing to look at Medicare or Medicaid within the context of the grand deal that Obama and House Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerTrump aide: Boehner is the disaster Boehner: Tax reform is 'just a bunch of happy talk' Lobbying World MORE (R-Ohio) were once willing to strike. BoehnerJohn BoehnerTrump aide: Boehner is the disaster Boehner: Tax reform is 'just a bunch of happy talk' Lobbying World MORE backed away from that sort of the bargain over the weekend because of differences on tax revenue. 

For his part, Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), House minority whip, stressed after Monday’s deficit talks that Democrats have been willing to discuss any and everything in the discussions.

In a Tuesday release, Sanders’s office also pushed the argument that Social Security was not driving deficits, and slammed the proposal to link benefits to chained CPI, a slower inflation measure. Such a move would lead to decreases in beneficiaries’ cost-of-living adjustments.