Bernie Sanders to Obama: Keep your word on Social Security

Other liberal senators, like Ohio's Sen. Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownSenate campaign fundraising reports roll in Commerce sends Trump long-awaited steel report GOP Rep. Jim Renacci announces Ohio Senate bid MORE, have criticized the president for considering changes to Medicare.

But in all, Democrats aren’t exactly on the same page as to what is currently on the table in the debt talks, which have an aim of reaching a deal that would allow Congress to raise the debt ceiling by Aug. 2.

On Tuesday, Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidDems search for winning playbook Dems face hard choice for State of the Union response The Memo: Immigration battle tests activists’ muscle MORE (D-Nev.) said he was only willing to look at Medicare or Medicaid within the context of the grand deal that Obama and House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerDems face hard choice for State of the Union response Even some conservatives seem open to return to earmarks Overnight Finance: Trump, lawmakers take key step to immigration deal | Trump urges Congress to bring back earmarks | Tax law poised to create windfall for states | Trump to attend Davos | Dimon walks back bitcoin criticism MORE (R-Ohio) were once willing to strike. BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerDems face hard choice for State of the Union response Even some conservatives seem open to return to earmarks Overnight Finance: Trump, lawmakers take key step to immigration deal | Trump urges Congress to bring back earmarks | Tax law poised to create windfall for states | Trump to attend Davos | Dimon walks back bitcoin criticism MORE backed away from that sort of the bargain over the weekend because of differences on tax revenue. 

For his part, Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-Md.), House minority whip, stressed after Monday’s deficit talks that Democrats have been willing to discuss any and everything in the discussions.

In a Tuesday release, Sanders’s office also pushed the argument that Social Security was not driving deficits, and slammed the proposal to link benefits to chained CPI, a slower inflation measure. Such a move would lead to decreases in beneficiaries’ cost-of-living adjustments.