Conservative groups line up against Boehner plan

“Perhaps worst of all,” Andrew Moylan of NTU said, “this package does nothing constructive to advance the cause of passing a Balanced Budget Amendment (BBA) to our Constitution that would insulate taxpayers from Washington’s recklessness.”

The “cut, cap and balance” plan would have only allowed a hike in the nation’s $14.3 trillion debt limit if Congress had first passed a a constitutional amendment to balance the federal budget. The Treasury Department says the ceiling needs to be raised by Aug. 2, which is next Tuesday.

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The Tuesday statements from the Club for Growth, NTU and Heritage Action came as John BoehnerJohn Andrew Boehner‘Lone wolf’ characterization of mass murderers is the epitome of white privilege Pelosi urges Ryan to create select committee on gun violence Ex-congressman Michael Grimm formally announces bid for old seat MORE (R-Ohio), Majority Leader Eric CantorEric CantorEric Cantor offering advice to end ‘immigration wars’ Trump's olive branch differs from the golden eras of bipartisanship After divisive rally, Trump calls for unity MORE (Va.) and other House GOP leaders were trying to tamp down uncertainty among conservatives within their conference about the newest proposal, which would trade a $1 trillion debt-ceiling increase for roughly $1.2 trillion in cuts.

Cantor urged fellow Republicans on Tuesday to buck up, line up behind the Speaker and stop “grumbling and whining about the plan.

But Rep. Jim Jordan, the chairman of the conservative Republican Study Committee, said at a Tuesday news conference that he was confident Boehner’s plan could not pass the House with just Republican votes. The Ohio Republican announced Monday that he could not support the framework, as did Rep. Jason ChaffetzJason ChaffetzOvernight Finance: Trump pitches massive tax cuts | Freedom Caucus endorses plan | Dems slam framework | House GOP to move B border wall bill | Officials under fire for private jet use GOP lawmaker pushes to end sports leagues' tax-exempt status Republicans predict Senate ObamaCare repeal would pass House MORE (R-Utah).

Boehner’s plan, according to estimates, would allow the ceiling to be raised until early next year. A new debt panel created by the proposal would be tasked with finding more deficit cuts that, if accepted, would allow the ceiling to be raised again.

Democrats have decried that approach, saying market uncertainty would result if the debt ceiling isn’t raised for a longer period of time.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidChris Murphy’s profile rises with gun tragedies Republicans are headed for a disappointing end to their year in power Obama's HHS secretary could testify in Menendez trial MORE (D-Nev.) has his own $2.7 trillion plan on the matter, which utilizes already expected savings from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and reduced interest payments.

The majority leader signaled on Tuesday that Boehner’s plan would go nowhere in his chamber, even if it did pass the House. But Reid’s plan has its own hurdles, and was slammed by Sen. Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGun proposal picks up GOP support Children’s health-care bill faces new obstacles Dems see Trump as potential ally on gun reform MORE (R-Ky.), the Senate minority leader.