Conservative groups line up against Boehner plan

“Perhaps worst of all,” Andrew Moylan of NTU said, “this package does nothing constructive to advance the cause of passing a Balanced Budget Amendment (BBA) to our Constitution that would insulate taxpayers from Washington’s recklessness.”

The “cut, cap and balance” plan would have only allowed a hike in the nation’s $14.3 trillion debt limit if Congress had first passed a a constitutional amendment to balance the federal budget. The Treasury Department says the ceiling needs to be raised by Aug. 2, which is next Tuesday.

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The Tuesday statements from the Club for Growth, NTU and Heritage Action came as BoehnerJohn BoehnerNew Trump campaign boss took shots at Ryan on radio show Election reveals Paul Ryan to be worst speaker in U.S. history Getting rid of ObamaCare means getting rid of Hillary MORE (R-Ohio), Majority Leader Eric CantorEric CantorTrump’s Breitbart hire sends tremors through Capitol Hill Cantor: Trump and Clinton 'very imperfect' Republican exodus from Trump grows MORE (Va.) and other House GOP leaders were trying to tamp down uncertainty among conservatives within their conference about the newest proposal, which would trade a $1 trillion debt-ceiling increase for roughly $1.2 trillion in cuts.

Cantor urged fellow Republicans on Tuesday to buck up, line up behind the Speaker and stop “grumbling and whining about the plan.

But Rep. Jim Jordan, the chairman of the conservative Republican Study Committee, said at a Tuesday news conference that he was confident Boehner’s plan could not pass the House with just Republican votes. The Ohio Republican announced Monday that he could not support the framework, as did Rep. Jason ChaffetzJason ChaffetzGOP chairman calls on Trump to release tax returns The Hill's 12:30 Report Dem senator's daughter could face Congress over EpiPen price hike MORE (R-Utah).

Boehner’s plan, according to estimates, would allow the ceiling to be raised until early next year. A new debt panel created by the proposal would be tasked with finding more deficit cuts that, if accepted, would allow the ceiling to be raised again.

Democrats have decried that approach, saying market uncertainty would result if the debt ceiling isn’t raised for a longer period of time.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidKoch network hits Clinton for the first time The Trail 2016: Focus on the Foundation Dear Cory Booker: How's that 'Camden Rising' thing working out? MORE (D-Nev.) has his own $2.7 trillion plan on the matter, which utilizes already expected savings from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and reduced interest payments.

The majority leader signaled on Tuesday that Boehner’s plan would go nowhere in his chamber, even if it did pass the House. But Reid’s plan has its own hurdles, and was slammed by Sen. Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellGiffords-backed gun control group endorses Toomey, Kirk Republicans say party can’t afford to cut ties to Trump McConnell calls for ObamaCare money to be used for Zika MORE (R-Ky.), the Senate minority leader.