Conservative groups line up against Boehner plan

“Perhaps worst of all,” Andrew Moylan of NTU said, “this package does nothing constructive to advance the cause of passing a Balanced Budget Amendment (BBA) to our Constitution that would insulate taxpayers from Washington’s recklessness.”

The “cut, cap and balance” plan would have only allowed a hike in the nation’s $14.3 trillion debt limit if Congress had first passed a a constitutional amendment to balance the federal budget. The Treasury Department says the ceiling needs to be raised by Aug. 2, which is next Tuesday.

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The Tuesday statements from the Club for Growth, NTU and Heritage Action came as BoehnerJohn BoehnerThe Trail 2016: The establishment comes around Pete King: Cruz 'gives Lucifer a bad name' White House: Boehner was just being honest about Cruz MORE (R-Ohio), Majority Leader Eric CantorEric CantorNRCC upgrades 11 'Young Guns' candidates Cruz, Kasich join forces to stop Trump 'Never Trump' groups collide with Kasich, Cruz MORE (Va.) and other House GOP leaders were trying to tamp down uncertainty among conservatives within their conference about the newest proposal, which would trade a $1 trillion debt-ceiling increase for roughly $1.2 trillion in cuts.

Cantor urged fellow Republicans on Tuesday to buck up, line up behind the Speaker and stop “grumbling and whining about the plan.

But Rep. Jim Jordan, the chairman of the conservative Republican Study Committee, said at a Tuesday news conference that he was confident Boehner’s plan could not pass the House with just Republican votes. The Ohio Republican announced Monday that he could not support the framework, as did Rep. Jason ChaffetzJason ChaffetzThe Trail 2016: Trump applies presidential polish, Cruz adds VP Chaffetz primary challenger files FEC complaint House passes bill limiting paid leave for feds under investigation MORE (R-Utah).

Boehner’s plan, according to estimates, would allow the ceiling to be raised until early next year. A new debt panel created by the proposal would be tasked with finding more deficit cuts that, if accepted, would allow the ceiling to be raised again.

Democrats have decried that approach, saying market uncertainty would result if the debt ceiling isn’t raised for a longer period of time.

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidOvernight Energy: Dems block energy spending bill for second day Senate GOP hardening stance against emergency funding for Zika Senate Dems block spending bill over Iran amendment — again MORE (D-Nev.) has his own $2.7 trillion plan on the matter, which utilizes already expected savings from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars and reduced interest payments.

The majority leader signaled on Tuesday that Boehner’s plan would go nowhere in his chamber, even if it did pass the House. But Reid’s plan has its own hurdles, and was slammed by Sen. Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellSenators roll out changes to criminal justice bill Sanders is most popular senator, according to constituent poll Senate Dems block spending bill over Iran amendment — again MORE (R-Ky.), the Senate minority leader.