Senate Dems: How will tax reform affect manufacturing?

Tax writers should know how any proposed overhaul of the U.S. tax code would affect the manufacturing industry, a group of Senate Democrats said Thursday.

Sens. Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowDems plan to make gun control an issue in Nevada Red-state Dems need more from Trump before tax embrace Stabenow: ‘Kid Rock might actually win the Republican primary’ MORE (Mich.), Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownDems plan to make gun control an issue in Nevada Mandel leads GOP primary for Ohio Senate seat: internal poll Red-state Dems need more from Trump before tax embrace MORE (Ohio), Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyDem senator: Inaction on gun control sending 'unintentional endorsement' Congress has a chance to make saving for college a lot easier Sen. Manchin won’t vote for Trump’s mine safety nominee MORE (Pa.) and Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenHouse bill set to reignite debate on warrantless surveillance Senate confirms No. 2 spot at HHS, days after Price resigns Overnight Cybersecurity: Equifax CEO faces outraged lawmakers | Dem presses voting machine makers on cyber defense | Yahoo says 3 billion accounts affected by 2013 breach MORE (Ore.) – all members of the Senate Finance Committee – said in a letter that tax reform legislation that chops away at manufacturing provisions could put the sector in a worse position.

“Incentives for domestic investment are vital to domestic job creation. Many of these provisions have been essential to the creation of good-paying jobs, including domestic manufacturing jobs, which have grown the U.S. economy and the middle class,” the four Democrats wrote to Tom Barthold, the head of the Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT).

“We believe that if tax reform eliminates these important tax provisions, it could adversely affect sectors of the economy that demand new domestic capital investment and that create and support good-paying jobs.”

The four tax writers specifically request that JCT do a thorough analysis of any tax reform bill that gets rolled out, to see how it affects different sectors of the economy.

Both Finance Chairman Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBernie Sanders flexes power on single-payer ObamaCare architect supports single-payer system Trump has yet to travel west as president MORE (D-Mont.) and House Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp (R-Mich.) have said that they’re pressing ahead with their efforts on tax reform, with Camp still insisting his panel will mark up a bill this year.

But the two also have to bridge deep divides between the parties, including over whether a rewritten code should raise more revenue, that has left many on and off Capitol Hill skeptical that they can complete legislation before the end of the current Congress.