Senate Dems: How will tax reform affect manufacturing?

Tax writers should know how any proposed overhaul of the U.S. tax code would affect the manufacturing industry, a group of Senate Democrats said Thursday.

Sens. Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowMich. Senate candidate opts for House run instead Report: GOP donors can't get in touch with Kid Rock Kid Rock denies press credentials to Detroit paper MORE (Mich.), Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell Brown'Hillbilly Elegy' author won't run for Senate Brown, Portman urge Trump administration to move quickly on a steel decision Dems call on DeVos to work with CFPB to protect student borrowers MORE (Ohio), Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseySenate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill GOP eying 'blue slip' break to help Trump fill the courts Dems offer alternative to Trump administration's child care proposal MORE (Pa.) and Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenSenate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill Overnight Defense: Senate passes 0B defense bill | 3,000 US troops heading to Afghanistan | Two more Navy officials fired over ship collisions Finance to hold hearing on ObamaCare repeal bill MORE (Ore.) – all members of the Senate Finance Committee – said in a letter that tax reform legislation that chops away at manufacturing provisions could put the sector in a worse position.

“Incentives for domestic investment are vital to domestic job creation. Many of these provisions have been essential to the creation of good-paying jobs, including domestic manufacturing jobs, which have grown the U.S. economy and the middle class,” the four Democrats wrote to Tom Barthold, the head of the Joint Committee on Taxation (JCT).

“We believe that if tax reform eliminates these important tax provisions, it could adversely affect sectors of the economy that demand new domestic capital investment and that create and support good-paying jobs.”

The four tax writers specifically request that JCT do a thorough analysis of any tax reform bill that gets rolled out, to see how it affects different sectors of the economy.

Both Finance Chairman Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBernie Sanders flexes power on single-payer ObamaCare architect supports single-payer system Trump has yet to travel west as president MORE (D-Mont.) and House Ways and Means Chairman Dave Camp (R-Mich.) have said that they’re pressing ahead with their efforts on tax reform, with Camp still insisting his panel will mark up a bill this year.

But the two also have to bridge deep divides between the parties, including over whether a rewritten code should raise more revenue, that has left many on and off Capitol Hill skeptical that they can complete legislation before the end of the current Congress.