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Heritage Action urges 'no' vote on Senate unemployment bill

Influential conservative group Heritage Action is urging lawmakers to vote "no" on a bipartisan Senate plan to renew federal unemployment benefits for the long-term jobless.

The conservative group said Thursday that it will "key vote" a bill that is expected to pass the Senate on Friday.

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Sens. Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Francis ReedDems walk tightrope on Pompeo nomination Dem senators call on FCC to protect against robocalls Senate Dems press Trump on legal justification for potential Syria strike MORE (D-R.I.) and Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerSenate GOP wary of new tax cut sequel GOP Senate hopefuls race to catch up with Dems Family, friends mourn death of Barbara Bush MORE (R-Nev.) have spearheaded negotiations on the nearly $10 billion bipartisan measure that cleared a procedural hurdle on Thursday, picking up 10 Republican votes.

The Senate voted 65-34 Thursday to advance the bill, setting up 30 hours of debate, although a vote is expected before time officially expires.

Republicans voting for the bill were Sens. Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteAudit finds US Defense Department wasted hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars US sends A-10 squadron to Afghanistan for first time in three years No, the US did not spend million on a gas station in Afghanistan MORE (N.H.), Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsOvernight Defense: Lawmakers worry over Syria strategy | Trump's base critical of strikes | Flake undecided on Pompeo | Coast Guard plans to keep allowing transgender members | GOP chair wants to cut B from Pentagon agencies Pompeo faces difficult panel vote after grilling by Dems Pompeo confirms he was interviewed by Mueller MORE (Ind.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Energy: Trump NASA pick advances after drama | White House office to investigate Pruitt's soundproof booth | 170 lawmakers call for Pruitt to resign Trump's NASA nominee advances after floor drama Family, friends mourn death of Barbara Bush MORE (Maine), Dean Heller (Nev.), Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP senator: Congress needs ‘to move on’ from Russia probe GOP senator: ‘Way too early’ to talk about supporting Trump in 2020 IG report faults fired FBI official McCabe for leak to media MORE (Wis.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiSenators press administration on mental health parity Overnight Energy: Watchdogs unveil findings on EPA, Interior controversies | GAO says EPA violated law with soundproof booth | IG says Zinke could have avoided charter flight | GOP chair probes Pruitt's four email addresses GOP fractures over push to protect Russia probe MORE (Alaska), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanTax rules will be subject to more OMB review under new memo Ending sex trafficking tomorrow requires preventing child abuse today Doctors bristle at push for opioid prescription limits MORE (Ohio), Pat Toomey (Pa.), Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerTrump backs Blackburn's Tennessee Senate bid Senate committee sets Monday vote even as Pompeo appears to lack support Corker has 'no idea' if Trump will run for reelection MORE (Tenn.) and Mark KirkMark Steven KirkHigh stakes as Trump heads to Hill Five things to watch for at Trump-Senate GOP meeting Giffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns MORE (Ill.).

The bill provides retroactive benefits for five months, back to the program’s lapse at the end of December through May.

"This bill would encourage prolonged unemployment for many Americans and would be paid for using accounting gimmicks that would pose unnecessary risks to taxpayers,” the Heritage statement said.

The Heritage Foundation’s James Sherk argued that the measure "would reduce the likelihood that more Americans would find employment quickly."

“Extended unemployment benefits are not an economic free lunch,” Sherk said.

“To find work, many workers will have to take positions that are much less than ideal. Extending benefits for too long encourages the unemployed to search for jobs that they will not find. This can hurt them in the long run.”

While the Senate is expected to pass the measure, it faces an uphill battle in the House against Republican leaders who say the bill fails to meet several of their requirements.