Report: Democrats receive more private-equity cash than GOP

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In a separate analysis of contributions from the last decade, eight of the top 10 lawmakers receiving private-equity funds were Democrats, according to the data. Over the time analyzed, then-Illinois Sen. Barack ObamaBarack ObamaOvernight Regulation: Trump administration reveals first regulatory agenda | GOP lawmakers introduce measures to repeal arbitration rule | Exxon gets M fine for sanctions violation Mounting nationwide immigration enforcement costs 20 attorneys general urge DeVos to keep college sexual assault protections MORE took in the largest amount, boosted in large part by the more than $1 million in private-equity contributions made in 2008 as he took on a presidential run. In 2011, Obama received $141,501 in contributions from private-equity sources as president.

His 2008 GOP opponent for the White House, Sen. John McCainJohn McCainOvernight Defense: Trump gets briefing at Pentagon on ISIS, Afghanistan | Senate panel approves five defense picks | Senators want Syria study in defense bill Schwarzenegger tweets to McCain: 'You'll be back' Trump called McCain to wish him well after cancer diagnosis MORE (R-Ariz.), came in second, receiving an election-year windfall of $839,525 from organizations and people tied to the industry.

Of the remaining top 10, Sen. Mark KirkMark KirkMcConnell: Senate to try to repeal ObamaCare next week GOP senator: Not 'appropriate' to repeal ObamaCare without replacement GOP's repeal-only plan quickly collapses in Senate MORE (R-Ill.) was the only other Republican to receive large amounts of private-equity cash.

Given New York's status as home of the nation's financial center, the Democratic delegation of the state is represented well on the list. Former Sen. Hillary ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonDem senator: Pardoning targets of Russia probe would be 'crossing a fundamental line' Trump officials: Russia meddled in the election Trump lawyers asking about presidential pardon powers: report MORE came in third, followed by Sens. Charles SchumerCharles SchumerLawmakers send McCain well wishes after cancer diagnosis OPINION | GOP's 7-year ObamaCare blood oath ends in failure Dems tout failure of GOP healthcare bill MORE and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandDems see huge field emerging to take on Trump LGBT group defends general after transgender comments Overnight Defense: Senate confirms Pentagon No. 2 | Uncertain future for Iran deal | Trump to visit Pentagon Thursday | Key general opposes military space corps MORE. Other influential Democrats also received substantial donations from the industry, including Sen. John KerryJohn KerryDems see huge field emerging to take on Trump Budowsky: Dems need council of war White House says US-Russia cyber unit would not share intel MORE (Mass.), former Sen. Chris Dodd (Conn.) and Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidConservative Senate candidate calls on GOP to end filibuster Ex-Reid aide: McConnell's 'original sin' was casting ObamaCare as 'partisan, socialist takeover' GOP faces growing demographic nightmare in West MORE (Nev.).

Reid's Republican counterpart, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellOvernight Regulation: Trump administration reveals first regulatory agenda | GOP lawmakers introduce measures to repeal arbitration rule | Exxon gets M fine for sanctions violation Overnight Healthcare: CBO predicts 22M would lose coverage under Senate ObamaCare replacement OPINION | GOP healthcare attack is a vendetta against President Obama MORE (R-Ky.), comes in at number 11.

The analysis comes as Democrats have joined competing GOP candidates in bashing Romney for his time at Bain. Seeking to take advantage of Romney saying on Monday that he "likes being able to fire people" in the context of remarks on healthcare coverage, the Democratic National Committee hosted a press call Monday with a former employee of a company taken over by Bain.

DNC Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.) accused Romney of "creating wealth on the backs of American workers by laying them off and shipping their jobs overseas." She received $21,000 from PACs or individuals tied to private equity over that same timeframe, good for 194th on the list, according to Maplight.

The pressure on Romney has driven the private-equity industry into the political fight. The Private Equity Growth Capital Council issued a statement Monday accusing both parties of spreading "misinformation" about the industry and argued that private equity firms play a key role in the economy — and that their takeovers of companies can "often" lead to growth and job creation, not layoffs.