Report: Democrats receive more private-equity cash than GOP

In a separate analysis of contributions from the last decade, eight of the top 10 lawmakers receiving private-equity funds were Democrats, according to the data. Over the time analyzed, then-Illinois Sen. Barack ObamaBarack Hussein ObamaJudge orders Walker to hold special elections Mueller investigates, Peters quits Fox, White House leaks abound 2020 Dems compete for top campaign operatives MORE took in the largest amount, boosted in large part by the more than $1 million in private-equity contributions made in 2008 as he took on a presidential run. In 2011, Obama received $141,501 in contributions from private-equity sources as president.

His 2008 GOP opponent for the White House, Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainAfghanistan is our longest war ever and Congress has abandoned all responsibility Kremlin: ‘We have a long way to go’ before any breakthrough with US The GOP is Trump's party now MORE (R-Ariz.), came in second, receiving an election-year windfall of $839,525 from organizations and people tied to the industry.

Of the remaining top 10, Sen. Mark KirkMark Steven KirkHigh stakes as Trump heads to Hill Five things to watch for at Trump-Senate GOP meeting Giffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns MORE (R-Ill.) was the only other Republican to receive large amounts of private-equity cash.

Given New York's status as home of the nation's financial center, the Democratic delegation of the state is represented well on the list. Former Sen. Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonWhite House would like to see Biden ‘in the boxing ring’ in 2020 House Judiciary chair subpoenas DOJ for FBI documents The suit to make Electoral College more ‘fair’ could make it worse MORE came in third, followed by Sens. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerAmtrak to rename Rochester station after Louise Slaughter Conscience protections for health-care providers should be standard Pension committee must deliver on retirement promise MORE and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandCynthia Nixon: Cuomo winning gold in Albany's 'corruption Olympics' 2020 Dems compete for top campaign operatives Amtrak to rename Rochester station after Louise Slaughter MORE. Other influential Democrats also received substantial donations from the industry, including Sen. John KerryJohn Forbes Kerry2020 Dems compete for top campaign operatives Kentucky candidate takes heat for tweeting he'd like to use congressman for target practice Breitbart editor: Biden's son inked deal with Chinese government days after vice president’s trip MORE (Mass.), former Sen. Chris Dodd (Conn.) and Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidGOP pushes to change Senate rules for Trump Trump presses GOP to change Senate rules Only thing Defense’s UFO probe proves is power of political favors MORE (Nev.).

Reid's Republican counterpart, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate approves .3 trillion spending bill, sending to Trump GOP senator threatened to hold up bill over provision to honor late political rival: report Paul: Shutting down government not my goal MORE (R-Ky.), comes in at number 11.

The analysis comes as Democrats have joined competing GOP candidates in bashing Romney for his time at Bain. Seeking to take advantage of Romney saying on Monday that he "likes being able to fire people" in the context of remarks on healthcare coverage, the Democratic National Committee hosted a press call Monday with a former employee of a company taken over by Bain.

DNC Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.) accused Romney of "creating wealth on the backs of American workers by laying them off and shipping their jobs overseas." She received $21,000 from PACs or individuals tied to private equity over that same timeframe, good for 194th on the list, according to Maplight.

The pressure on Romney has driven the private-equity industry into the political fight. The Private Equity Growth Capital Council issued a statement Monday accusing both parties of spreading "misinformation" about the industry and argued that private equity firms play a key role in the economy — and that their takeovers of companies can "often" lead to growth and job creation, not layoffs.