Senate approves terror insurance bill

The Senate approved legislation Thursday to reauthorize the Terrorism Risk 
Insurance Act (TRIA) for six years, over the objections of some Democrats who criticized a provision they said would weaken Wall Street regulations.

The bill, which cleared the House a day earlier, passed the upper chamber on a 93-4 vote.

Sens. Marco RubioMarco RubioBreitbart, liberal activist cooperated on GOP primary disruptions: report Obama seeks down-ballot gains after being midterm loser Chamber endorses bill to block proposed estate tax rules MORE (R-Fla.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenThe Trail 2016: Who is really winning? Graham: GOP Senate could rein in Clinton White House Clinton: Warren gets under Trump's 'thin skin like nobody else' MORE (D-Mass.), Bernie SandersBernie SandersThe Trail 2016: Who is really winning? The evidence backs Trump: We have a duty to doubt election results A Good Year to Go Green (Party) MORE
 (I-Vt.) and Maria CantwellMaria CantwellUS wins aerospace subsidies trade case over the EU Wells CEO Stumpf resigns from Fed advisory panel Overnight Energy: Lawmakers kick off energy bill talks MORE (D-Wash.) opposed the measure.

Despite reservations over the Wall Street language, President Obama is expected to sign the bill, the first sent to his desk in the new GOP-controlled Congress.

Many Democrats — including Warren — opposed a provision that would amend the 2010 Dodd-Frank Wall Street reform
 law. The measure, sought in some sectors of the financial services industry, would scrap certain regulations for nonfinancial institutions — dubbed 
"end users" — that are applied to big banks.

Warren's amendment to remove the "end users" provision failed, by a 66-31 vote tally. 

TRIA allows for the federal government to serve a backstop for businesses after a massive terrorist attack.

House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling (R-Texas) pushed for TRIA reforms that he said would better protect taxpayers in the event of a major terror strike.

Hensarling successfully pushed to double the amount of damage that businesses must incur during an attack from $100 million to $200 million, to trigger federal repayments.

The vote comes one day after a terrorist attack on a French newspaper left 12 people dead.

A broad coalition of groups from the banking, professional sports and tourism industries rallied to push for a long-term reauthorization bill. The Chamber of Commerce and the NFL were among those who supported the legislation.

Hensarling and Sen. Chuck SchumerCharles SchumerReid: 'I have set the Senate' for nuclear option Immigration was barely covered in the debates GOP leaders advise members to proceed with caution on Trump MORE (D-N.Y.) were unable to negotiate a deal before TRIA expired on Dec. 31. 

Their talks fell apart largely because of the end users provision, but also because Sen. Tom CoburnTom CoburnRyan calls out GOP in anti-poverty fight The Trail 2016: Words matter Ex-Sen. Coburn: I won’t challenge Trump, I’ll vote for him MORE (R-Okla.), who has since retired, opposed another rider attached to the bill that would create a nonprofit clearinghouse for insurance agents. He pushed for states to be able to opt out of the program.

The House passed the TRIA bill on Wednesday on a 416-5 vote.

— This story was updated at 2:52 p.m.