Ryan: Offshore profits 'Plan A' for highways

Ryan: Offshore profits 'Plan A' for highways
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House Ways and Means Chairman Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanGOP super PAC hits Dem House hopeful as 'Pelosi liberal' in new Kansas ad Trump revokes Brennan's security clearance The Hill's 12:30 Report MORE (R-Wis.) made it clear Thursday that tapping offshore corporate profits was his top choice for funding a longer-term highway bill.

In fact, Ryan declined to even lay out what the House GOP's "Plan B" might be, ahead of a looming July 31 deadline for highway funding. 

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The Wisconsin Republican and other top lawmakers in both parties have said they could get behind a short-term highway extension until the end of the year — at a cost of about $8 billion — to allow lawmakers to work on a revamp of the international tax system that could fund infrastructure projects.

"That's what our first preference is," Ryan said at a breakfast sponsored by Politico, adding that a new framework for international taxes and highways from Sens. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanSenate panel spars with Trump administration over treatment of unaccompanied immigrant children Senate study: Trump hasn’t provided adequate support to detained migrant children Senators introduce bill to change process to levy national security tariffs MORE (R-Ohio) and Chuck SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerReforms can stop members of Congress from using their public office for private gain Election Countdown: GOP worries House majority endangered by top of ticket | Dems make history in Tuesday's primaries | Parties fight for Puerto Rican vote in Florida | GOP lawmakers plan 'Freedom Tour' Senate Democrats should stop playing politics on Kavanaugh MORE (D-N.Y.) "tracks with what the House has been doing."

Plans from both sides of the aisle, and the bipartisan framework from Schumer and Portman, have proposed taxing the roughly $2 trillion that businesses have offshore well below the current 35 percent corporate rate and using that money for highways. Ryan said that sort of proposal would only work as part of a broader tax revamp that shielded most offshore corporate profits from U.S. taxation.

He also reiterated that Congress wouldn't raise the gas tax, the Highway Trust Fund's primary funding source, a point Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP leader criticizes Republican senators for not showing up to work Reforms can stop members of Congress from using their public office for private gain Name change eludes DHS cyber wing, spurring frustration MORE (R-Ky.) made this week as well. Instead, Ryan said that a six-year highway deal would allow lawmakers to investigate new ways for user fees to fund infrastructure projects, given that higher fuel efficiency standards have lowered the gas tax's effectiveness.

"We want a six-year highway bill," Ryan said. "We want to give states the ability to plan ahead."

But there are plenty of obstacles toward getting a long-term highway deal — not least the fact that McConnell, Senate Finance Chairman Orrin HatchOrrin Grant HatchDem lawmaker calls Trump racist in response to 'dog' comment PETA calls out Trump for attacking Omarosa as a 'dog' Hatch 'not comfortable' with Trump calling Omarosa a 'dog' MORE (R-Utah) and other key GOP senators have been cool to the idea of using the offshore profits for highways.

Some Senate Republicans, seeking to keep their majority in 2016, have said they want to extend highway projects past next year's elections. McConnell said this week that he would bring a highway bill to the Senate floor as soon as next week.

The details of an international tax revamp — including what rate to tax the roughly $2 trillion offshore and whether to give new incentives for intellectual property — will also undoubtedly prove challenging for tax writers.

But Ryan maintained that the interest of top Democrats such as Schumer in a plan that would exempt most offshore corporate profits from U.S. taxation, something Republicans have long favored, was at the very least a good start as lawmakers search for solutions.