28 Republicans pledge to oppose any bill funding Planned Parenthood

28 Republicans pledge to oppose any bill funding Planned Parenthood
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Twenty-eight House Republicans now say they will oppose any legislation to fund the government that also continues to fund Planned Parenthood, according to an updated tally released on Tuesday by conservative group Heritage Action for America.

That’s the maximum number of Republicans that GOP leaders can lose in a vote without help from Democrats.

Ten more people have signed onto the letter, spearheaded by Rep. Mick Mulvaney (R-S.C.), since it was initially sent to leadership in July.

An aide to Mulvaney said Tuesday that the letter will close later this week to give lawmakers an opportunity to sign it after returning to Capitol Hill from the August recess.

“We must act to fully defund Planned Parenthood. Please know that we cannot and will not support any funding resolution – an appropriations bill, an omnibus package, a continuing resolution, or otherwise – that contains any funding for Planned Parenthood, including mandatory funding streams,” the letter says.

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The latest lawmakers to sign the letter include Republican Reps. Ted YohoTed YohoGOP rep: I would have met with Russians for opposition research The Hill's 12:30 Report Why global health investments are key to ‘Making America Great’ MORE (Fla.), Jody Hice (Ga.), David Rouzer (N.C.), Dave Brat (Va.), Mark Meadows (N.C.), Scott DesJarlais (Tenn.), Mark Walker (N.C.), Brian Babin (Texas), David SchweikertDavid SchweikertFreedom Caucus backs three debt ceiling options Bipartisan lawmakers give blood in honor of Scalise GOP senators pleased with Ivanka Trump meeting on family leave, child tax credits MORE (Ariz.) and Trent Kelly (Miss.), according to Heritage Action’s tally.

The letter was originally signed by GOP Reps. Mick Mulvaney (S.C.), Jim Jordan (Ohio), John FlemingJohn FlemingCoast Guard suspends search for missing Ohio plane Freedom Caucus member to bring up bill on impeaching IRS chief GOP seeks to make it 52 MORE (La.), Raúl Labrador (Idaho), Matt SalmonMatt SalmonComey fallout weighs on the GOP Conservative activists want action from Trump Senators fear fallout of nuclear option MORE (Ariz.), Tim Huelskamp (Kan.), Jeff Duncan (S.C.), Thomas Massie (Ky.), Trey GowdyTrey GowdyGOP lawmaker wants former Obama aide to testify Overnight Cybersecurity: FBI pick says Russia probe not a 'witch hunt' | Massive Verizon data leak | Agencies restricted from using Russian security software GOP Rep. Gowdy slams Trump team for 'amnesia' on Russia meetings MORE (S.C.), Walter Jones (N.C.), Curt Clawson (Fla.), Jim BridenstineJim BridenstineHouse lawmakers back amendment requiring Pentagon climate change report Lawmakers sound alarm on space security The Hill's Whip List: 36 GOP no votes on ObamaCare repeal plan MORE (Okla.), Keith Rothfus (Pa.), Randy WeberRandy WeberThe Hill's Whip List: 19 GOP no votes on new ObamaCare replacement bill Ryan transfers record M to House GOP's campaign arm in March Freedom Caucus poised for pivotal role in infrastructure fight MORE (Texas), Scott Perry (Pa.), Steve Pearce (N.M.), Trent FranksTrent FranksHouse briefed on anti-ISIS campaign progress Republicans rally around Sessions after Trump criticism Rep: Charlie Gard granted permanent residence status MORE (Ariz.) and Louie GohmertLouie GohmertSteve King compares military pay for gender transition to Ottoman's castrating slaves House passes 6.5B defense policy bill Budget process drags as GOP struggles for consensus MORE (Texas).

While the number of signatures has grown over the August recess, it’s a very small number compared to the 80 House Republicans that signed onto a letter in 2013 pushing GOP leaders to defund ObamaCare. That led to a 16-day government shutdown that October.

House Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerSudan sanctions spur intense lobbying OPINION | GOP's 7-year ObamaCare blood oath ends in failure A simple fix to encourage bipartisanship in the House MORE (R-Ohio) has so far called for congressional investigations into Planned Parenthood and has not said how he would address funding for the organization. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellOPINION | GOP healthcare attack is a vendetta against President Obama Fox News personality: GOP healthcare plan says ‘ideology is less important than victory' Rand Paul opens door to backing healthcare bill on key hurdle MORE (R-Ky.) suggested in an interview last week that it would have to wait for a new president.

Rep. Diane BlackDiane BlackOvernight Finance: GOP lawmakers introduce measures to repeal consumer bureau arbitration rule | Feds fine Exxon M for violating Russia sanctions while Tillerson was CEO | Senate committee ignores Trump, House budgets in favor of 2017 funding levels House committee advances budget resolution Debate rages in GOP over 3 billion in cuts  MORE (R-Tenn.) has a stand-alone bill that would defund the organization and her spokesman said she has secured a “commitment” from House GOP leadership for her measure to come to a floor vote in the coming weeks.

Meanwhile, Sen. Ted CruzTed CruzCruz offers bill to weaken labor board's power The Hill's 12:30 Report CBO: 22 million would lose coverage under Senate ObamaCare replacement MORE (R-Texas) is circulating a letter similar to Mulvaney’s in the Senate. An aide to Cruz said Tuesday that the letter will be finalized in the next few weeks.

Congress must pass legislation to keep the government funded through Oct. 1.