28 Republicans pledge to oppose any bill funding Planned Parenthood

28 Republicans pledge to oppose any bill funding Planned Parenthood
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Twenty-eight House Republicans now say they will oppose any legislation to fund the government that also continues to fund Planned Parenthood, according to an updated tally released on Tuesday by conservative group Heritage Action for America.

That’s the maximum number of Republicans that GOP leaders can lose in a vote without help from Democrats.

Ten more people have signed onto the letter, spearheaded by Rep. Mick Mulvaney (R-S.C.), since it was initially sent to leadership in July.

An aide to Mulvaney said Tuesday that the letter will close later this week to give lawmakers an opportunity to sign it after returning to Capitol Hill from the August recess.

“We must act to fully defund Planned Parenthood. Please know that we cannot and will not support any funding resolution – an appropriations bill, an omnibus package, a continuing resolution, or otherwise – that contains any funding for Planned Parenthood, including mandatory funding streams,” the letter says.

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The latest lawmakers to sign the letter include Republican Reps. Ted YohoTed YohoDem lawmaker renews push for infrastructure, tax package Savings through success in foreign assistance GOP rep: I would have met with Russians for opposition research MORE (Fla.), Jody Hice (Ga.), David Rouzer (N.C.), Dave Brat (Va.), Mark Meadows (N.C.), Scott DesJarlais (Tenn.), Mark Walker (N.C.), Brian Babin (Texas), David SchweikertDavid SchweikertFreedom Caucus backs three debt ceiling options Bipartisan lawmakers give blood in honor of Scalise GOP senators pleased with Ivanka Trump meeting on family leave, child tax credits MORE (Ariz.) and Trent Kelly (Miss.), according to Heritage Action’s tally.

The letter was originally signed by GOP Reps. Mick Mulvaney (S.C.), Jim Jordan (Ohio), John FlemingJohn FlemingCoast Guard suspends search for missing Ohio plane Freedom Caucus member to bring up bill on impeaching IRS chief GOP seeks to make it 52 MORE (La.), Raúl Labrador (Idaho), Matt SalmonMatt SalmonSchumer tells Sinema he's backing her in Ariz. Senate race Comey fallout weighs on the GOP Conservative activists want action from Trump MORE (Ariz.), Tim Huelskamp (Kan.), Jeff Duncan (S.C.), Thomas Massie (Ky.), Trey GowdyTrey GowdyGowdy: Sarah Sanders doesn't get say whether Comey broke the law Trump condemns Rice's unmasking: 'What she did was wrong' Sessions, Coats push for permanent renewal of controversial surveillance law MORE (S.C.), Walter Jones (N.C.), Curt Clawson (Fla.), Jim BridenstineJim BridenstineTrump stacks administration with climate change skeptics Trump’s NASA pick deletes posts from social media: report Trump to tap House Republican as NASA chief: report MORE (Okla.), Keith Rothfus (Pa.), Randy WeberRandy WeberGOP worries as state Dems outperform in special elections How Republicans split on the Harvey aid, fiscal deal House passes Trump deal on majority Democratic vote MORE (Texas), Scott Perry (Pa.), Steve Pearce (N.M.), Trent FranksTrent FranksGOP rep: North Korea wants Iran-type nuclear deal Debt-ceiling gambit stirs GOP debate GOP rep shares story of brother with Down syndrome, condemns abortions MORE (Ariz.) and Louie GohmertLouie GohmertHow Republicans split on the Harvey aid, fiscal deal House passes Trump deal on majority Democratic vote Lawmakers press DOJ to help victims of Ponzi scheme MORE (Texas).

While the number of signatures has grown over the August recess, it’s a very small number compared to the 80 House Republicans that signed onto a letter in 2013 pushing GOP leaders to defund ObamaCare. That led to a 16-day government shutdown that October.

House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerSpeculation mounts, but Ryan’s job seen as safe Boehner warns Trump: Don't pull out of Korea-US trade deal GOP Rep: Ryan wasting taxpayers dollars by blocking war authorization debate MORE (R-Ohio) has so far called for congressional investigations into Planned Parenthood and has not said how he would address funding for the organization. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate passes 0B defense bill Overnight Health Care: New GOP ObamaCare repeal bill gains momentum Overnight Finance: CBO to release limited analysis of ObamaCare repeal bill | DOJ investigates Equifax stock sales | House weighs tougher rules for banks dealing with North Korea MORE (R-Ky.) suggested in an interview last week that it would have to wait for a new president.

Rep. Diane BlackDiane Lynn BlackOvernight Finance: House passes .2T funding package for 2018 | FTC launches Equifax probe | Mnuchin defends honeymoon jet request | Floor vote on House Budget unlikely until October Overnight Finance: GOP plans to unveil tax framework in late September | Critical stretch for Trump tax team | Equifax CEO called to testify | Sanders unveils single-payer bill MORE (R-Tenn.) has a stand-alone bill that would defund the organization and her spokesman said she has secured a “commitment” from House GOP leadership for her measure to come to a floor vote in the coming weeks.

Meanwhile, Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSenate Dems hold floor talk-a-thon against latest ObamaCare repeal bill Overnight Finance: CBO to release limited analysis of ObamaCare repeal bill | DOJ investigates Equifax stock sales | House weighs tougher rules for banks dealing with North Korea GOP state lawmakers meet to plan possible constitutional convention MORE (R-Texas) is circulating a letter similar to Mulvaney’s in the Senate. An aide to Cruz said Tuesday that the letter will be finalized in the next few weeks.

Congress must pass legislation to keep the government funded through Oct. 1.