Carson releases tax plan

Carson releases tax plan
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Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson on Monday released his tax plan that includes a 14.9 percent flat tax.

"My flat tax plan has the power to rekindle our nation’s founding ideals by eliminating the needless complexity and treating every American, rich and poor, with or without lobbyists or lawyers, equal in their ability to achieve the American Dream," Carson said in the document detailing his plan.

The 14.9 percent tax would apply to both personal and business income. It would apply only to income above 150 percent of the federal poverty level, though citizens whose income is at or below that level would have to make an annual de minimis tax payment.
 
Carson's plan would eliminate taxation of capital gains, dividends and interest at the individual level. The alternative minimum tax and the estate tax would also be eliminated.
 
The proposal would do away with deductions and other tax breaks — including the deductions for mortgage interest, charitable giving and state and local taxes, which are often thought of as sacred cows. 
 
Sens. Ted CruzTed CruzThe media couldn't be more blatant in distorting Trump's words on Charlottesville Curtis wins GOP primary for House seat vacated by Jason Chaffetz Kimmel: Let’s make Trump a king so he has no power MORE (R-Texas) and Rand PaulRand PaulCurtis wins GOP primary for House seat vacated by Jason Chaffetz Glimmer of hope in bipartisan criminal justice reform effort Trump barrage stuns McConnell and his allies MORE (R-Ky.) also are proposing flat taxes on income, though their plans essentially include value-added taxes. Proposals from other GOP candidates — including Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpAssange meets U.S. congressman, vows to prove Russia did not leak him documents A history lesson on the Confederacy for President Trump GOP senator: Trump hasn't 'changed much' since campaign MORE, Sen. Marco RubioMarco RubioScarborough: Trump has chosen the 'wrong side' THE MEMO: Trump reignites race firestorm RNC spokeswoman: GOP stands behind Trump's message 'of love and inclusiveness' MORE (Fla.) and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush — keep some deductions and lower the top individual rate without moving to a flat tax.
 
"Unlike proposals advanced by other candidates, my tax plan does not compromise with special interests on deductions or waffle on tax shelters and loopholes," Carson said in the document. "Nor does it falsely claim to be a flat tax while still deriving the bulk of its revenues through higher business flat taxes that amount to a European-style value-added tax." 
 
Carson has fallen in the polls and two of his top aides resigned last week, but he still managed to raise $23 million in the fourth quarter of 2015.