OVERNIGHT MONEY: Obama takes economic message home

The president is pressing Congress to pass a ban on military-style assault weapons and high-capacity magazines, as well as improve background checks.

The divisive issue will probably have a hard time gaining traction in Congress. 

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On Tuesday, Obama urged lawmakers to consider some changes and give those who have suffered from gun violence “a simple vote.” 

Chicago is enduring one of its worst-ever periods of gun violence, with more than 500 killed last year. 

The trip to Chicago comes after a visit to Asheville, N.C., where he focused on ramping up the nation's manufacturing sector, and a trip on Thursday to Atlanta, where he presented a plan to provide nationwide pre-K program. 

He told teachers in Decatur, Ga., that "we all pay a price" when students don't have access to quality early-childhood education.

"The size of your paycheck shouldn't determine your child's future," Obama said. "So let's fix this. Let's make sure none of our kids start out the race of life a step behind."

Obama's proposal, which he first mentioned on Tuesday, provides federal matching dollars to states with the goal of providing preschool for every 4-year-old from moderate- or low-income families. 

On Wednesday, he argued that manufacturing would keep the nation's middle class "growing" and "thriving" at an auto parts plant in Asheville, N.C.

“I believe in manufacturing,” Obama said. “I believe it makes our economy stronger.”


WHAT ELSE WE'RE WATCHING

Freeze frame: The House on Friday will vote on and probably pass legislation that would halt President Obama's executive order calling for a 0.5 percent pay hike next month.

Republicans are arguing that the government can't afford the pay hike, which will cost $11 billion over the next decade. Democrats countered that the bill is an attempt by Republicans to continue picking on federal workers who have had their pay frozen for the last two years.


Democrats complained throughout the debate that the bill should be split in two, because it would freeze the pay of federal workers and members of Congress. 

Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colo.) accused Republicans of combining the two because of the difficulty some might have voting against a bill that limits congressional pay.


BREAKING NEWS

Selling the sequester: Senate Democratic leaders unveiled a $110 billion sequester-replacement bill at a caucus meeting on Thursday that would replace $85 billion in automatic spending cuts set to hit March 1.

The Senate Democratic package is split evenly between spending cuts and provisions raising new tax revenues.

It would raise nearly $54 billion in taxes by implementing the Buffett Rule, setting a minimum effective tax rate for wealthy individuals and families, as well as raise additional revenues by changing the tax treatment of oil extraction from oil sands.

The measure also contains $3.5 billion in new farm program spending, pushed by Senate Agriculture Committee Chairwoman Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowNew Kid Rock film explores political divide Congress must work with, not against, tribal communities in crafting Farm Bill Senate Dems to Mnuchin: Don't index capital gains to inflation MORE (D-Mich.).

In exchange, Stabenow has signed off on a cut of $27.5 billion in farm subsidies known as direct payments. 

White House press secretary Jay Carney said Republicans face "a simple choice" now that Senate Democrats have proposed a plan.

"Do they protect investments in education, health care and national defense or do they continue to prioritize and protect tax loopholes that benefit the very few at the expense of middle and working class Americans?" Carney asked in a statement released by the White House.

Earlier in the day, House Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerFormer top Treasury official to head private equity group GOP strategist Steve Schmidt denounces party, will vote for Democrats Zeal, this time from the center MORE (R-Ohio) said if the president was "serious about enacting his agenda," Senate Democrats needed to start proposing solutions to looming financial deadlines.

Still, the Democratic plan could face opposition from its more liberal members, who want to raise more money through taxes and cut less in spending.


CABINET WATCH

A no-go, for now: Senate Republicans voted 58-40 to block former Sen. Chuck HagelCharles (Chuck) Timothy HagelOvernight Defense: Latest on historic Korea summit | Trump says 'many people' interested in VA job | Pompeo thinks Trump likely to leave Iran deal Should Mike Pompeo be confirmed? Intel chief: Federal debt poses 'dire threat' to national security MORE’s (R-Neb.) nomination as Defense secretary from proceeding to a final up-or-down vote, with 60 needed to end debate. 

Four Republicans — Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate moving ahead with border bill, despite Trump On The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Senators hammers Ross on Trump tariffs | EU levies tariffs on US goods | Senate rejects Trump plan to claw back spending Senate moderates hunt for compromise on family separation bill MORE (Maine), Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranTodd Young in talks about chairing Senate GOP campaign arm US farming cannot afford to continue to fall behind Mississippi Democrat drops Senate bid MORE (Miss.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiIcebreaking ships are not America’s top priority in the Arctic 13 GOP senators ask administration to pause separation of immigrant families Trump plan to claw back billion in spending in peril MORE (Alaska) and Mike JohannsMichael (Mike) Owen JohannsMeet the Democratic sleeper candidate gunning for Senate in Nebraska Farmers, tax incentives can ease the pain of a smaller farm bill Lobbying World MORE (Neb.) — joined 55 Democrats and independents in supporting the nomination. 

Republicans senators argued that they needed more time to vet Hagel for the job and would take time during next week's recess to make a final decision of their support or opposition. 


LOOSE CHANGE

Failure threat: Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerOn The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Senators hammers Ross on Trump tariffs | EU levies tariffs on US goods | Senate rejects Trump plan to claw back spending Senators hammer Ross over Trump tariffs GOP senator demands details on 'damaging' tariffs MORE (R-Tenn.), sent a letter to federal banking regulators after a Senate Banking Committee hearing on Thursday asking if the economy would be threatened by the failure of any single financial institution. He sent the letter to Under Secretary of the Treasury Mary J. Miller and Federal Reserve Governor Daniel K. Tarullo.

“My question was: ‘Are there any individual financial institutions whose failure would pose a systemic risk to the United States?’ I was disappointed in your answer, which seemed to indicate that you do not know if there are institutions whose failure might threaten the stability of our country,” Corker wrote. 

“[W]ould you please let me know if there are currently any financial institutions so large or so complex that their failure would threaten the financial stability of the United States?  If so, how do you plan to resolve this issue?”

So sweet: A group of bipartisan lawmakers is co-sponsoring a bill to lower sugar prices and make it easier to sell and trade sugar as a way to save consumers and businesses upward of $3.5 billion a year. 

The result, they say, would be lower food prices across the board, as well as lower costs and more jobs for businesses, such as confectioners. 

Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Pa.), who introduced the measure to the farm bill last summer, was joined by Sens. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenAmerica will not forget about Pastor Andrew Brunson Shaheen sidelined after skin surgery Members of Congress demand new federal gender pay audit MORE (D-N.H.), Mark KirkMark Steven KirkThis week: Trump heads to Capitol Hill Trump attending Senate GOP lunch Tuesday High stakes as Trump heads to Hill MORE (R-Ill.), Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDemocrats protest Trump's immigration policy from Senate floor Live coverage: FBI chief, Justice IG testify on critical report Hugh Hewitt to Trump: 'It is 100 percent wrong to separate border-crossing families' MORE (D-Ill.), Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanSenate moving ahead with border bill, despite Trump 13 GOP senators ask administration to pause separation of immigrant families Lawmakers, businesses await guidance on tax law MORE (R-Ohio), Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.), Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinSenate moving ahead with border bill, despite Trump Senate moderates hunt for compromise on family separation bill Texas official compares Trump family separation policy to kidnapping MORE (D-Calif.), Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteErnst, Fischer to square off for leadership post The Hill's Morning Report: Koch Network re-evaluating midterm strategy amid frustrations with GOP Audit finds US Defense Department wasted hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars MORE (R-N.H.) and Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar Alexander13 GOP senators ask administration to pause separation of immigrant families IBM-led coalition pushes senators for action on better tech skills training Dems seek to leverage ObamaCare fight for midterms MORE (R-Tenn.), as well as Reps. Joe Pitts (R-Pa.), Danny Davis (D-Ill.), Earl BlumenauerEarl BlumenauerBipartisan lawmakers agree — marijuana prohibition has failed and it’s time to change the law Commodity checkoff reform needed Overnight Defense: Latest on scrapped Korea summit | North Korea still open to talks | Pentagon says no change in military posture | House passes 6B defense bill | Senate version advances MORE (D-Ore.) and Bob GoodlatteRobert (Bob) William GoodlatteTrump, GOP launch full-court press on compromise immigration measure Meadows gets heated with Ryan on House floor The Hill's 12:30 Report - Sponsored by Delta Air Lines - Trump says he will sign 'something' to end family separations MORE (R-Va.). 

“This flawed policy hurts not only candy companies and food manufacturers, but also the families who end up paying higher costs for products made with sugar,” Toomey said.


ECONOMIC INDICATORS 

Industrial Production-Capacity Utilization: The Federal Reserve will release its January report showing the physical output of the nation's factories, mines and utilities. The monthly report also provides a measure of capacity utilization. 

Michigan Sentiment: Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan will release its measure of consumer sentiment for February. 


WHAT YOU MIGHT HAVE MISSED

— Legislation would raise business lending caps for credit unions
— Senate Dems hold the line on consumer bureau
— Sen. Warren presses regulators to take firmer line with banks
BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerFormer top Treasury official to head private equity group GOP strategist Steve Schmidt denounces party, will vote for Democrats Zeal, this time from the center MORE challenges Senate Dems to take lead, pass Obama second-term agenda
— USPS poll: Public backs five-day delivery
— Gallup: Americans support ending Saturday mail delivery
— Lawmakers claim momentum in push for Internet sales tax
— Obama favors sacking the penny
— Talks continue between AFL-CIO, Chamber on immigration reform
— Senators urge regulators to scrap down payment rule
— US, Switzerland sign tax evasion agreement
Jobless claims drop by 27,000


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