Senators float trade sanctions against Russia over Snowden

A Senate panel on Thursday approved a State Department funding bill with a provision aimed at pressuring Russia to reject asylum for National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden.

The provision, authored by Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamCNN to air sexual harassment Town Hall featuring Gretchen Carlson, Anita Hill Trump wrestles with handling American enemy combatants Flake: Trump's call for DOJ to probe Democrats 'not normal' MORE (R-S.C.), was adopted unanimously by the Senate Appropriations Committee. It states that if Snowden is granted asylum, then the secretary of State must consult with Congress on possible sanctions.

“The Committee notes that certain countries have offered asylum to Edward Snowden, an American citizen who divulged classified information to the press. The Committee directs the Secretary of State to consult with the appropriate congressional committees on sanction options against any country that provides asylum to Mr. Snowden, including revocation or suspension of trade privileges and preferences,” the Graham amendment states.

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The language of the Graham amendment stops well short of actually imposing sanctions. Furthermore, Russia is now a member of the World Trade Organization, so trade sanctions by the U.S. could invite WTO-approved retaliation.

Graham has been a leading critic of Russia's handling of Snowden, and has said President Obama should consider boycotting the Winter Olympics next year in Sochi, Russia, if the country decides to harbor him.

Snowden remains at an airport in Moscow and is seeking documents to travel in Russia.

Graham's sanctions provision is now part of the Senate’s funding bill for the State Department in 2014, which was approved by the full committee on Thursday.

Overall, the State Department and foreign operations appropriations title spends $50.6 billion. That is $10 billion more than the House is proposing, but a cut of $2.7 billion from 2013.

The bill passed committee on a 23 to 7 vote.

Seven Republicans joined Democrats in approving the bill, underscoring GOP divisions on spending cuts to the budget next year. They were: Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsBipartisan group of lawmakers aim to reform US sugar program A bipartisan bridge opens between the House and Senate Gaming the odds of any GOP tax bill getting signed into law MORE (Maine), Thad CochranWilliam (Thad) Thad CochranWhite House requests B for missile defense to counter North Korea Senate narrowly passes 2018 budget, paving way for tax reform Live coverage: The Senate's 2018 budget 'vote-a-rama' MORE (Miss.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiMoore digs in amid mounting GOP criticism Republicans float pushing back Alabama special election Moore defends himself as pressure mounts MORE (Alaska), Graham, Mark KirkMark KirkHigh stakes as Trump heads to Hill Five things to watch for at Trump-Senate GOP meeting Giffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns MORE (Ill.), Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntWe must fund community health centers now Overnight Tech: Senators demand tech firms do more on Russian meddling | House Intel releases Russian-promoted ads | Apple CEO says 'fake news' bigger threat than ads | Ex-Yahoo CEO, Equifax execs to testify on breaches Facebook: Clinton, Trump campaigns spent a combined M on ads MORE (Mo.) and Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranAn unlikely bipartisan solution on energy and taxes Alexander struggles to find health-care breakthrough Overnight Tech: House Intel to release Russian Facebook ads | Trump tweet on NBC draws backlash | Senators want answers from alleged robocall king | Twitter reverses on Blackburn ad MORE (Kan.)

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Ranking Member Sen. Richard Shelby (R-Ala.) said he voted against the bill because it contributes to a $1.058 trillion topline level of 2014 spending that exceeds the level imposed by sequestration.

Graham said he is proud of the bill and especially new restrictions on aid to Egypt after the ouster of president Mohamed Morsi.

“Is it a coup? Sounds like it to me,” he said. “Having said that Egypt was running down a dangerous road under Morsi.”

The bill divides up the $1.3 billion in military aid to Egypt into four pieces and conditions 75 percent of it of various democratization steps.

The committee adopted several controversial amendments.

One, adopted by a 19 to 11 vote, was authored by Sen. Mary LandrieuMary LandrieuYou want to recall John McCain? Good luck, it will be impossible CNN producer on new O'Keefe video: Voters are 'stupid,' Trump is 'crazy' CNN's Van Jones: O'Keefe Russia 'nothingburger' video 'a hoax' MORE (D-La.) would allow funding for UNESCO for a specific Louisiana project, despite a ban on UNESCO dealings due to their recognition of Palestine.

Another, passed 17 to 12, would fund International Criminal Court efforts to prosecute Lord’s Resistance Army leader Joseph Kony.

Finally an amendment by Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenDefense bill includes 3,500 more visas for Afghans who helped US troops Overnight Finance: Day three of tax bill markup | Ryan says election results raise pressure for tax reform | Tax whip list - Where Republicans stand | Justice, AT&T spar over CNN sale | 25 Dems vow to block spending without Dream Act Russia crackdown survives NDAA conference MORE (D-N.H.) would permanently end the so-called global gag rule that, before suspended by President Obama, would cut off funding for international groups that also promote abortion.

It passed 19 to 11.