Stocks surge as Congress hatches fiscal deal

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidConservative Senate candidate calls on GOP to end filibuster Ex-Reid aide: McConnell's 'original sin' was casting ObamaCare as 'partisan, socialist takeover' GOP faces growing demographic nightmare in West MORE (D-Nev.) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellPence raises million for PAC at fundraiser: report Dems don’t want to help GOP improve repeal bill Bipartisan group of governors calls on GOP to reject skinny repeal MORE (R-Ky.) huddled with their members on Capitol Hill and hammered out the final details of a deal that could gain congressional approval before the end of the day. 

Senate leaders indicated they would take the reins and vote first as GOP senators such as Ted CruzTed CruzTrump sounds like Pete Wilson — and that scares Calif. GOP Bare-bones repeal plan gains steam in Senate Dem lawmaker: Trump should fire Sessions MORE of Texas said he would not stand in the way of quick passage.  

Speaker John BoehnerJohn BoehnerBoehner on Trump tweets: He gets 'into a pissing match with a skunk' every day Boehner predicts GOP will 'never' repeal, replace ObamaCare Sudan sanctions spur intense lobbying MORE (R-Ohio) is expected to put the Senate agreement — extending the debt ceiling to Feb. 7 and opening the government until Jan. 15 — on the floor Wednesday.



"The Speaker will bring that bill to the House floor," Rep. Kevin BradyKevin BradyCBO survives two House amendments targeting funding White House, GOP close to releasing joint tax-reform principles Mnuchin meets with agriculture groups on tax reform MORE (R-Texas) told Bloomberg television Wednesday morning.

The bill will allow President Obama to retain his power to use so-called extraordinary measures to preserve the ability of the government to pay its bills once it reaches the debt limit. The Treasury Department told Congress in May that the nation had hit the debt limit and it would be implementing thos measures. 

The situation looked bleak on Tuesday night after House Republicans failed to garner enough votes for their latest plan, throwing the negotiations back to the Senate, where progress had been made earlier this week. 

The pending deal also would create a budget conference designed to find replacement cuts for sequestration. The group of chosen members would have to report back by mid-December.

The credit rater Fitch said on Tuesday that the United States is on watch for a possible downgrade.

This posted was updated at 12:50 p.m.