Senate agriculture panel clears Lincoln's derivatives bill

The legislation crafted by Sen. Blanche Lincoln (D-Ark.), the panel's chairwoman, would require nearly all derivatives to be subjected to a clearinghouse. 

Sen. Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyOvernight Finance: Dems seek probe of acting SEC chief | Defense hawks say they won't back short-term funding | Senate seen as start point for Trump infrastructure plan | Dems want more money for IRS Overnight Regulation: Trump administration lifts Obama freeze on federal coal mining Senators offer bill aimed at helping IRS whistleblowers MORE (Iowa) was the only Republican to support the bill. Other Republicans opposed the bill, in part, because they felt requiring all derivatives trades to go through a clearinghouse would prove too costly. 

Sen. Saxby ChamblissSaxby ChamblissSpicer: Trump will 'help the team' if needed in Georgia special election Wyden hammers CIA chief over Senate spying Cruz is a liability MORE (R-Ga.), the committee's ranking member, offered an amendment to limit the number of trades that would be subjected to a clearinghouse. His measure failed, 9 to 12. 

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A clearinghouse is used to ensure the soundness of the investment that is being traded. For example, the New York Stock Exchange is a clearinghouse for equity trades.

The bill now heads to the Senate floor for final consideration. It is expected to be rolled into a Wall Street reform bill written by Banking Committee Chairman Chris Dodd (D-Conn.) that has dominated the Senate's politics this week.

Under Lincoln's legislation, the Treasury Department will determine what derivatives trades must go through a clearinghouse. It also would force banks to divest in derivatives trades if they want to be eligible for federal assistance. The bill also requires that foreign trades go through the clearinghouse.