Durbin wins battle to pass 'interchange fee' legislation, 64-33

The Senate on Thursday passed controversial legislation clamping down on fees that card issuers charge merchants, handing Senate Majority Whip Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinSenate approves resolution warning Trump not to hand over US officials Deal to fix family separations hits snag in the Senate Senate Democrats block resolution supporting ICE MORE (D-Ill.) a major victory.

As part of debate on Wall Street overhaul, the Senate passed, 64-33, legislation championed by Durbin that drew significant Republican support. Ten Democrats opposed the legislation, while 17 Republicans crossed the aisle to support a bill that aims to rein in fees placed on debit cards.

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Durbin earlier on Thursday railed on the bank lobby for opposing the legislation. The Independent Community Bankers of America, Credit Union National Association and National Association of Federal Credit Unions (NAFCU) loudly opposed Durbin's measure.

"It is a shame that their attempt at getting back at big banks and large credit card companies has spilled over to credit unions and community banks," said Dan Berger, executive vice president at NAFCU. "This will do nothing for consumers but go straight to the bottom line of the big box stores and giant retailers."

Durbin overcame the lobbying to pass legislation that requires the Federal Reserve to issue rules on swipe fees for debit cards to ensure fees are "responsible and proportional" to processing costs. The legislation does not ban swipe card fees. Durbin had won strong backing from merchant and retail groups. Durbin said the restrictions would not apply to banks and credit unions with $10 billion or less in assets.

"It wasn't introduced as a partisan amendment," Durbin said Thursday before the vote. "I brought this because it is a small business, retail amendment that I think is valid and just."

Rep. Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchDems struggle with unity amid leadership tensions New Dem star to rattle DC establishment Overnight Defense: Defense spending bill amendments target hot-button issues | Space Force already facing hurdles | Senators voice 'deep' concerns at using military lawyers on immigration cases MORE (D-Vt.), who is a strong supporter of efforts to rein in card fees, praised the Senate vote.

"This momentous, overwhelming vote sends an unambiguous message to credit card companies that the American people have had enough of swipe fees and have had enough of cash register rip-offs," Welch said.

Senate Democrats opposing the amendment were: Daniel Akaka (Hawaii), Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusJudge boots Green Party from Montana ballot in boost to Tester Clients’ Cohen ties become PR liability Green Party puts Dem seat at risk in Montana MORE (Mont.), Evan Bayh (Ind.), Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperOvernight Energy: Fewer than half of school districts test for lead | Dems slam proposed changes to Endangered Species Act | FEMA avoids climate change when discussing plan for future storms Dems slam proposed changes to Endangered Species Act Full interview: Democratic candidate Kerri Evelyn Harris discusses her Senate campaign in Delaware MORE (Del.), Tim JohnsonTimothy (Tim) Peter JohnsonSenate GOP rejects Trump’s call to go big on gun legislation Court ruling could be game changer for Dems in Nevada Bank lobbyists counting down to Shelby’s exit MORE (S.D.), Ted Kaufman (Del.), Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillOvernight Health Care: Trump officials explore importing prescription drugs | Key ObamaCare, drug pricing regs under review | GOP looks to blunt attacks on rising premiums | Merck to lower some drug prices Dems pressure GOP to take legal action supporting pre-existing conditions The Hill's Morning Report — Trump’s walk-back fails to stem outrage on Putin meeting MORE (Mo.), Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterOvernight Defense: Trump inviting Putin to DC | Senate to vote Monday on VA pick | Graham open to US-Russia military coordination in Syria Senate to vote Monday on Trump's VA nominee On The Money: Trump rips Fed over rate hikes | Dems fume as consumer agency pick refuses to discuss border policy | Senate panel clears Trump IRS nominee MORE (Mont.) and Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerSenate panel advances Trump IRS nominee Bipartisan bill would bring needed funds to deteriorating National Park Service infrastructure Senate Dems press for info on any deals from Trump-Putin meeting MORE (Va.). Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) also opposed the legislation.

Senate Republicans supporting Durbin's bill were: John Barasso (Wyo.), Scott Brown (Mass.), Richard BurrRichard Mauze BurrCongress should build upon the ABLE Act, giving more Americans with disabilities access to financial tools Christine Todd Whitman: Trump should step down over Putin press conference GOP lambasts Trump over performance in Helsinki MORE (N.C.), Saxby ChamblissClarence (Saxby) Saxby ChamblissLobbying World Former GOP senator: Let Dems engage on healthcare bill OPINION: Left-wing politics will be the demise of the Democratic Party MORE (Ga.), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsThe Hill's Morning Report — Russia furor grips Washington Overnight Health Care: Novartis pulls back on drug price hikes | House Dems launch Medicare for All caucus | Trump officials pushing ahead on Medicaid work requirements Senate panel to vote next week on banning 'gag clauses' in pharmacy contracts MORE (Maine), Mike CrapoMichael (Mike) Dean CrapoOn The Money: Trump rips Fed over rate hikes | Dems fume as consumer agency pick refuses to discuss border policy | Senate panel clears Trump IRS nominee Dems fume as Trump's consumer bureau pick refuses to discuss role in border policy McConnell calls for Senate hearings on Russia sanctions MORE (Idaho), John Ensign (Nev.), Mike EnziMichael (Mike) Bradley EnziBudget chairs press appropriators on veterans spending Forcing faith-based agencies out of the system is a disservice to women Senate takes symbolic shot at Trump tariffs MORE (Wyo.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamOvernight Defense: Trump inviting Putin to DC | Senate to vote Monday on VA pick | Graham open to US-Russia military coordination in Syria Polling analyst: Changes to legal immigration ‘the real sticking point among Democrats’ Graham would consider US-Russia military coordination in Syria MORE (S.C.), Charles GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleySenators push to clear backlog in testing rape kits Controversial Trump judicial nominee withdraws The Hill's Morning Report — Trump’s walk-back fails to stem outrage on Putin meeting MORE (Iowa), Johnny IsaksonJohn (Johnny) Hardy IsaksonOvernight Defense: Trump inviting Putin to DC | Senate to vote Monday on VA pick | Graham open to US-Russia military coordination in Syria Senate to vote Monday on Trump's VA nominee GOP senators introduce resolution endorsing ICE MORE (Ga.), George LeMieux (Fla.), Richard Lugar (Ind.), Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischGOP senators introduce resolution endorsing ICE Senate takes symbolic shot at Trump tariffs GOP lawmaker presses Bolton to examine Obama administration's response to Russian cyberattacks MORE (Idaho), Olympia Snowe (Maine), David VitterDavid Bruce VitterSenate panel advances Trump nominee who wouldn't say if Brown v. Board of Education was decided correctly Planned Parenthood targets judicial nominee over abortion comments Trump nominates wife of ex-Louisiana senator to be federal judge MORE (La.) and Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerGOP senators introduce resolution endorsing ICE Hillicon Valley: Lawmakers eye ban on Chinese surveillance cameras | DOJ walks back link between fraud case, OPM breach | GOP senators question Google on Gmail data | FCC under pressure to delay Sinclair merger review Top Senate Republicans question Google over Gmail data practices MORE (Miss.).

Sens. Robert Byrd (D-WVa.), Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-Texas) and Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonElection security bill picks up new support in Senate Senators share their fascination with sharks at hearing Senate Dems build huge cash edge in battlegrounds MORE (D-Fla.) did not vote.

"This amendment helps big merchants, but consumers will pay the price," MasterCard said in a statement.