Slaughter dings Obama plan for new spending-cut powers

President Barack ObamaBarack ObamaOvernight Cybersecurity: Trump tweetstorm on Russia probe | White House reportedly pushing to weaken sanctions bill | Podesta to testify before House Intel OPINION: Trump’s bluff: Perfectly legal Overnight Regulation: Senate Banking panel huddles with regulators on bank relief | FCC proposes 2M fine on robocaller | Yellowstone grizzly loses endangered protection MORE's proposal is similar to the presidential line-item veto authority that was struck down by the Supreme Court in the late 1990s. 

Other senior Democrats have yet to support the White House proposal, sent to Congress on Monday. Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Calif.) and Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry ReidDems see surge of new candidates Dems to grind Senate to a halt over ObamaCare repeal fight GOP fires opening attack on Dem reportedly running for Heller's Senate seat MORE (Nev.) have said they would review the proposal. Democrats backing the plan are Sen. Russ Feingold (D-Wis.) and House Blue Dogs, who have made similar proposals, as well as House Budget Chairman John Spratt (D-S.C.), who will introduce Obama's proposal in the House.

House Republicans said they "welcomed" Obama's proposal but said it wasn't nearly enough to deal with the $13 trillion debt.

Slaughter warned that the new presidential authority could weaken Congress's power of the purse, echoing the concerns of appropriators, most notably Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.).

"I do not believe that it's wise for Congress to hand over its Constitutionally-mandated responsibilities in any situation, but especially not when it comes to appropriations," Slaughter said. "This Congress — joined by the current Administration — has worked very hard to bring down the deficit and restore fiscal discipline and I am not sure that giving up our authority over this is the best way to lead."