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Senate talks on tax package focus on Medicaid payments to states

“What our Republicans believe is that the bill spends too much money and not enough of the money it does spend is offset,” said Senate Minority Whip Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.). “Part of that money is called FMAP — that goes to states … My guess is that [Democrats’] third iteration of the bill probably will reduce it some and will provide some additional offsets.”

Reid told reporters the legislation remains a work in progress.

“We’re going to make some changes,” he said. “I’ve had a couple of meetings today already and we realized that the No. 1 issue, at least that’s been explained to me by some of my Republican friends, is the aid that we’re trying to get to states.”

Draft legislation floated on K Street on Tuesday weans states from FMAP funding by phasing out payments over a six-month period. Democratic Senate staffers disavowed the proposal, saying it was a product of K Street lobbyists seeking to gin up support for the bill.

Centrist Republican Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Tech: Judge blocks AT&T request for DOJ communications | Facebook VP apologizes for tweets about Mueller probe | Tech wants Treasury to fight EU tax proposal Overnight Regulation: Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks | Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare | FCC to officially rescind net neutrality Thursday | Obama EPA chief: Reg rollback won't stand FCC to officially rescind net neutrality rules on Thursday MORE (Maine), whose support for the bill could be crucial to its survival, floated the idea of winding down state funding under FMAP over a year ago.

“I have always felt … that it was a disservice to states to have a cliff in the Medicaid funding where one month they are getting it completely and the next month they are getting none,” she said. “That’s something I proposed over a year ago. I did not propose it as a way to reduce the cost of this bill. I just think it’s a good policy.”

Collins has twice voted against procedural motions on the tax extenders bill because of their cost.

“That’s been my No. 1 concern,” Collins said of extenders adding to the deficit.

Kyl said he isn’t sure winding down FMAP is the elixir Democrats think it is in garnering Republican support for the bill.

“Whether that will satisfy more Republicans remains to be seen,” he said. “There are other issues with the bill as well, including issues related to the tax provisions.”

Senate Republican Conference Chairman Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderOvernight Health Care: Trump health chief backs CDC research on gun violence | GOP negotiators meet on ObamaCare market fix | Groups sue over cuts to teen pregnancy program GOP negotiators meet on ObamaCare market fix 30 million people will experience eating disorders — the CDC needs to help MORE (Tenn.) argues Republicans should help fix a problem that Democrats largely created by themselves when they included additional FMAP funding in the original stimulus bill.

“The Democrats created this financial cliff that states are going to run off at the end of the year by expanding Medicaid,” he said. “Just to add that in again [to the bill], in my view — even if it is paid for — just extends the cliff another year for states, and it would be bad policy.”


Vicki Needham and Alexander Bolton contributed to this article.