Dems and GOP go tit-for-tat on healthcare premiums

Medicare's chief actuary has also testified that the law would increase healthcare costs and that some people may lose their current coverage as their employer drops coverage. The Senate Republican Communications Center on Friday released a list of insurance companies in several states — California, Vermont, Iowa, Washington and Connecticut — who have recently hiked rates and in some cases blamed the new law.

"More promises of lower premiums for some people at some point in the future is little comfort to those who are already seeing higher premiums or won't be able to keep the coverage they have as the president promised," Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) said Friday.

The health insurance industry, meanwhile, repeated its refrain that focusing on premiums without tackling underlying healthcare costs won't make coverage more affordable.

"The document released today overstates the cost savings associated with certain provisions of the new law and ignores major provisions that will raise premiums, including the new premium tax, age rating restrictions that impact younger workers, and benefit mandates that exceed the coverage that many purchase today," Karen Ignagni, president and CEO of America's Health Insurance Plans, said in a statement. "While tax credits are important to help people pay for coverage, tax credits do not bring down the growth of medical costs or reduce health insurance premiums."