Senators unveil bipartisan bill to restrict use of antibiotics in food animals

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The agricultural and animal drug industries say current practices are safe and keep animals healthy. A new study of E. coli in the scientific journal Microbial Drug Resistance, however, raises concerns that low doses of antibiotics, of the sort administered on U.S. farms to promote animal growth, create the "greatest risk" of promoting drug-resistant bacteria.

"The extensive use of antibiotics in the agricultural sector has turned farms into sources of resistant microbes," the study says. "The resistance selected for in the agricultural setting may be a direct threat as zoonotic agents become resistant or it can be indirect as it is eventually transferred from animal commensals to human pathogens."

The bill is cosponsored by Sens. Dianne FeinsteinDianne FeinsteinCelebrating the contributions of the National Park Service at its centennial France, Germany push for encryption limits Lochte apologizes for behavior in Rio MORE (D-Calif.), Susan CollinsSusan CollinsGOP senator considering Libertarian ticket Trump’s Second Amendment people threaten Hillary’s legacy, not life Sunday shows preview: Trump's tough week MORE (R-Maine), Jack ReedJack ReedDems to GOP: Admit Trump is 'unfit' to be president Armed Services leaders encouraged after first conference meeting US urges China to be calm in wake of South China Sea ruling MORE (D-R.I.) and Barbara BoxerBarbara BoxerFeds weigh whether carbon pollution should be measured in highway performance Juan Williams: Dems should not take Latinos for granted Reid faces Sanders supporters' fury at DNC MORE (D-Calif.). It was immediately praised by the Pew Campaign on Human Health and Industrial Farming.

"The emergence of drug-resistant superbugs is a human health problem that affects us all," said Laura Rogers, the program's project director. "We commend Senator Feinstein, Senator Collins, Senator Reed and Senator Boxer for their bipartisan collaboration to ensure that our antibiotics will work for us when we need them most."