White House cheers news that health law not adding to healthcare costs

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The increase in premiums is smaller than in 2009, when it grew by 5.7 percent. Claims paid out in 2010 saw an even slower increase of just 3.7 percent, however, the first time in seven years that the growth in premiums grew faster than the growth in claims paid out as Americans cut back on visits to the doctor and opted for less expensive medical treatments because of the recession.

In her blog post, DeParle points out that the law's medical loss ratio requirement will ensure that insurers give rebates back to their customers if they collect too much in premiums.

DeParle points out, "Starting in 2011, insurance companies are required to publicly disclose and justify any premium increases larger than 10 percent. Many states have the authority to reject unreasonable premium increases and the Affordable Care Act gives states $250 million to strengthen their rate review programs. Additionally, insurers are required to spend at least 80 percent of your premium dollars on health care expenses instead of overhead and profits."