Planned Parenthood hands out anti-Romney condoms

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Each sleeve also displays a factoid from Planned Parenthood Action Fund about Romney's positions on women's health, such as "Romney would repeal the Affordable Care Act and end access to no co-pay birth control."

The condom wrapper states, "PROPER ATTIRE required for entry," a message from the condom manufacturer, Proper Attire.

Abortion-rights groups have played a prominent role in the Democratic convention as women's health issues take center stage in the race for the White House.

In a speech Thursday, PPAF President Cecile Richards said it is like "waking up in a bad episode of 'Mad Men'" to hear GOP leaders rail against her group. 

"When Mitt Romney says he'll 'get rid of' Planned Parenthood, and turn the clock back on a century of progress, it has real consequences for the 3 million patients who depended on Planned Parenthood last year," Richards told the Charlotte crowd.

Anti-abortion-rights leader Marjorie Dannenfelser responded by calling Democrats "radically out of step with mainstream Americans" on abortion.

For weeks, the two parties have been exchanging blows over their official stances on the issue. The GOP platform would ban abortion in all cases, while Democrats' would allow it in all cases.

Planned Parenthood has also been a target for Republican lawmakers, who want to end its public funding over the abortion services it provides.

Ferrero said the PPAF condoms are especially popular this year because "our issues are much more prominent in this election than they have been in a very long time."

He said the group also distributed condoms in 2008, adding, "People love them."

This is not the first time PPAF's tactics have made a splash. Earlier this summer, the group sent a giant pack of birth control to follow Romney on the campaign trail.

In Charlotte, PPAF volunteers have been out in force, hoping passers-by will sign petitions or agree to receive emails.

The free condoms are also good for laughs, a group of volunteers told The Hill.

Among the best responses: A middle-aged women exclaimed, "I may get lucky tonight!" And a man decided to return the condom, saying: "It’s O.K. I’ve been fixed."