Study: Health law has imposed 111 million hours of paperwork

Some provisions of the law are designed to raise premiums — for example, doing away with bare-bones plans known as "mini-meds" that offer low premiums but will place steep annual caps on benefits.

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But critics say other provisions, such as requiring insurance companies to cover people with pre-existing conditions, will have bigger premium impacts than intended.

New regulations on insurers will ultimately affect customers, the forum said.

"Beyond the political scapegoats in the healthcare debate, large insurance companies, individuals also face strong regulatory headwinds. Many of the $30 billion in costs will eventually affect individuals, in some form," the study said.