Doctors group warns GOP: Don't increase uninsured

Doctors group warns GOP: Don't increase uninsured
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The nation’s leading doctors group is warning the incoming Trump administration not to strip away a single person’s health coverage as it works to dismantle ObamaCare.  

The American Medical Association (AMA) on Tuesday released a two-page document that outlines its top goals for healthcare reform under incoming President Trump.

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One of the top items is making sure that “any future proposals do not cause individuals covered as a result of [Affordable Care Act] provisions to become uninsured,” the AMA wrote.

"A core principle is that any new reform proposal should not cause individuals currently covered to become uninsured,” the group said.

The group released the document after an interim meeting of its House of Delegates, which was held immediately after last week’s election.

Dr. Andrew Gurman, the group’s president, told members Saturday that he would judge the GOP-led healthcare reform based on how many people it covers, the type of access and choice it provides and whether it offers high-quality care.  

Much of the group’s latest platform runs counter to the GOP’s plans to dismantle ObamaCare.

For example, the AMA supports the current system for tax credits, which is based on income.

The GOP has said it plans to move toward an age-based reimbursement. Under House Speaker Paul RyanPaul RyanThe Hill Interview: Budget Chair Black sticks around for now Gun proposal picks up GOP support GOP lawmaker Tim Murphy to retire at end of term MORE’s (R-Wis.) plan, the “portable payment” would grow over time as each person gets older.  

The AMA has also urged a further expansion of Medicaid, allowing more lower-income people to get coverage.

Republicans, led by Ryan, have proposed empowering states to run their Medicaid programs using block grants, which could lead to program downsizing in red states.

There could be some agreements, however.  

The AMA highlights the GOP’s focus on streamlining certain rules and regulations.
 
“Policymakers have a notable opportunity to also reduce excessive regulatory burdens that diminish physicians' time devoted to patient care and increase costs,” the group wrote.
 
The AMA also calls for allowing young people to remain on a parent’s healthcare plans until age 28, two years longer than the current law. Republicans including Trump have already said they support allowing dependents to stay on plans until age 26.