Senate Dems ward off GOP efforts to thwart ObamaCare rollout

Senate Democrats on Thursday defeated a series of Appropriations panel amendments designed to foil the implementation of ObamaCare. 

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The victory for Dems came as Sen. Marco RubioMarco RubioFlorida: 'High likelihood' of first Zika transmission in the US Overnight Healthcare: Rubio presses Obama to spend Zika money | FDA moves ahead with trans fat ban The Trail 2016: Her big night MORE (R-Fla.) threatened to reject any bill to fund the government unless it defunds the healthcare law.

With the congressional budget process at a stalemate, the remarks from Rubio signal what could become another showdown over funding for the Affordable Care Act. 

The health appropriations bill that advanced in committee Thursday provides more than $5 billion to the agency charged with overseeing healthcare reform. 

Amendments offered by the GOP would have delayed the employer and individual mandates, rescinded funds for the insurance exchanges and the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB), and stopped the exchanges if technical glitches or other problems came up before Oct. 1. 

The measures were defeated on mostly party-line votes, with vulnerable Democratic Sen. Mark PryorMark PryorCotton pitches anti-Democrat message to SC delegation Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm Top Democrats are no advocates for DC statehood MORE (Ark.) supporting the repeal of funds for the IPAB.

The budget for the controversial Medicare cost-cutting board would have been transferred to a program supporting pediatric medical residents.

The author of that amendment, Sen. Jerry MoranJerry MoranMeet the rising GOP star who already enrages the left GOP warming up to Cuba travel Senate clears FAA authorization bill MORE (R-Kan.), also moved to spend $1.35 billion of the exchanges' budget on the National Institutes of Health. 

Moran's two amendments were defeated 15-15 and 16-14, respectively.

Sens. Dan CoatsDan CoatsMcAuliffe: I wouldn't want a 'caretaker' in Kaine's Senate seat Indiana GOP taps lieutenant governor to replace Pence GOP rallies to Trump's 'law and order' message after Baton Rouge MORE (R-Ind.) and Thad CochranThad CochranWhy a bill about catfish will show whether Ryan's serious about regulatory reform Capitol locked down for second time in a week This week: Congress eyes the exits in dash to recess MORE (R-Miss.) offered the proposal to stop the exchanges from operating if one fails to accept applicants on Oct. 1.

Sen. Tom HarkinTom HarkinGrassley challenger no stranger to defying odds Clinton ally stands between Sanders and chairmanship dream Do candidates care about our health or just how much it costs? MORE (D-Iowa), who leads the Health Appropriations subcommittee, said the measure would shut down the marketplaces over something as simple as an enrollment website crashing.

"This is another attempt [for Republicans] to do what they can to stop the Affordable Care Act from being implemented," Harkin said.

"We know that the exchanges are going to open" on schedule, he added.

Thursday's markup advances the 2014 Labor, Health and Human Service and Education Appropriations bill. The legislation would spend about $164 billion total.

In a stark contrast to past appropriations bills, which have often garnered bipartisan support, the measure was approved on a party-line vote of 16-14.

On the transportation, agriculture, veterans and energy titles, between six and eight Republicans voted yea with Democrats even though the bills violate budget caps put in place by the sequestration law.

The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) quickly jumped on the yea vote from Sen. Mark BegichMark BegichSenate GOP deeply concerned over Trump effect Ex-Sen. Kay Hagan joins lobby firm Unable to ban Internet gambling, lawmakers try for moratorium MORE (Alaska), saying the first-term Democrat had endorsed the "ObamaCare train wreck."

"When the cameras are off behind closed doors, Alaskans cannot trust Mark Begich," said NRSC spokeswoman Brook Hougesen in a statement.

The White House also weighed in Thursday, calling GOP arguments against the employer mandate delay disingenuous. 

"This is about an attempt to sabotage the Affordable Care Act," said White House spokesman Jay Carney at a press conference.

"They want to kill the bill. They want to kill the law. They want to undermine the law. They've made that clear. They're proud of it, and that's a fine position to take.

"But it's the law. And it's been upheld by the Supreme Court … It's being implemented responsibly," he said.

This story was updated at 2:05 and 6:00 p.m.