Amash: GOP wants to 'ram' ObamaCare plan through Congress

Republican Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashGOP leaders agree to consider Dec. 30 spending bill House approves motion to go to tax conference — with drama Overnight Finance: House approves motion to go to tax conference — with drama | GOP leaders to consider Dec. 30 spending bill | Justices skeptical of ban on sports betting | Mulvaney won't fire official who sued him MORE (Mich.) on Tuesday said his party's leadership wants to “ram” its plan to repeal and replace ObamaCare through Congress — echoing language the GOP used to criticize ObamaCare's original passage in 2010.

“They have to start over. I think the problem actually is that they’re not working with Democrats,” Amash told CNN’s “At This Hour.”

“The whole objective of our leadership team is to ram this through, then go to phase two and have the HHS secretary make the changes, and those changes are only in place as long as he’s the secretary,” he added, referencing Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price.

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House Republicans introduced two measures Monday to repeal and replace the healthcare legislation. The new plan would create a tax credit system to incentivize individuals to purchase coverage. It would also eliminate ObamaCare’s individual mandate, which required individuals to purchase insurance or pay a fine to the government.

The conservative House Freedom Caucus says the GOP does not have the votes to pass the legislation. The Republican-controlled House needs 218 votes to pass the new legislation, meaning it can only afford to lose 20 members.

Amash, who has said he will vote no on what he called “ObamaCare 2.0,” argued that Republicans should work with Democrats “to find common ground.”

“I think that we can convince Democrats that repeal and major reforms to the healthcare system are needed,” he said.

Republicans frequently complained that President Obama and the Democrats rushed ObamaCare through and did not listen to GOP complaints in 2010 when the party controlled the White House and both chambers of Congress.