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Sanders says he will introduce 'Medicare for all' bill

Sanders says he will introduce 'Medicare for all' bill

Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersTrump has declared war on our climate — we won’t let him win Stock slide bites boastful Trump, but rising wages great for GOP Millions should march on DC to defeat Trump Republicans MORE (I-Vt.) is planning to introduce a single-payer healthcare bill in Congress.

The Vermont senator said during a town hall Saturday he plans to introduce a "Medicare for all" bill "within a couple of weeks," Vermont Public Radio reported.

“It is a commonsense proposal, and I think once the American people understand it, we can go forward with it,” Sanders said after the town hall meeting.

During the town hall, Rep. Peter WelchPeter Francis WelchClinton mulls role in 2018 midterms Trump talks tough but little action seen on drug prices Frustrated with Trump, Dems introduce drug pricing bill MORE (D-Vt.) said he would introduce the same bill in the House.

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“Well, you know, it’s a goal. In this Congress, we won’t pass it,” Welch said after the town hall.  “But I think we have to do keep the goal out there, because we need in this country, like any industrialized country, a healthcare system that’s affordable, accessible and universal.”

Welch said he will "reach out to [his] Republican colleagues with specific proposals about some of the things we can do to fix some of the issues in the Affordable Care Act."

The comments come after Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanMcConnell: 'Whoever gets to 60 wins' on immigration Overnight Defense: Latest on spending fight - House passes stopgap with defense money while Senate nears two-year budget deal | Pentagon planning military parade for Trump | Afghan war will cost B in 2018 House passes stopgap spending measure with defense money MORE (R-Wis.) on Friday pulled the American Health Care Act, the GOP's healthcare proposal, amid dwindling support among Republicans.

The move marked the first legislative defeat for President Trump and followed seven years of rhetoric from Republicans who campaigned on a pledge to repeal and replace ObamaCare.
 
The president blamed Democrats for not backing the bill. He signaled he would move on to other legislative priorities, such as tax reform.