Opioid crisis becomes central issue in debate over Medicaid

Opioid crisis becomes central issue in debate over Medicaid
© Victoria Sarno Jordan/Keren Carrion

The national opioid crisis is becoming a political hurdle for Senate Republicans negotiating an -ObamaCare repeal-and-replace bill that could end the healthcare law’s expansion of Medicaid. 

Legislation approved by the House would cut off Medicaid expansion in 2020, ending payouts to states and reducing federal funding to the program by about $880 billion, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.

ADVERTISEMENT
That’s a big problem for lawmakers such as Sens. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanOvernight Cybersecurity: Equifax security employee left after breach | Lawmakers float bill to reform warrantless surveillance | Intel leaders keeping collusion probe open Reddit hires first lobbyists Senate panel approves bill compelling researchers to ‘hack’ DHS MORE (R-Ohio) and Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Moore CapitoLawmakers try again on miners’ pension bill How the effort to replace ObamaCare failed It's time to eliminate the secretive Pharmacy Benefit Manager pricing practices MORE (R-W.Va.), who fear the cuts could hurt thousands of people in their states receiving help for addictions to prescription drugs and heroin.

Nearly 30 percent of people receiving health coverage through Medicaid expansion have a mental health or substance use disorder or both, according to the National Council for Behavioral Health.  

In states like West Virginia, Ohio and Alaska, Medicaid pays for between 34 to 50 percent of one form of medication-assisted treatment for substance use disorders.

Overall, Medicaid, which helps low-income and disabled people, is the single largest payer for these services.

-ObamaCare gave states the option of expanding Medicaid, and states that did so received federal money. Many of the states hit hardest by the opioid epidemic are those that chose to expand Medicaid.

“What we’re seeing now in Alaska with Medicaid expansion — we’re seeing individuals who for the first time ever have an ability to receive treatment that they need,” Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiRepublicans jockey for position on immigration GOP senator knocks Trump: 'Not a fan of governing by tweet' How the effort to replace ObamaCare failed MORE (R-Alaska) said.

Of opioid addicts in her state, Capito says: “Without that expanded Medicaid, they wouldn’t be getting treatment.

“They would be without any kind of coverage in that area, so it’s exceedingly important to kicking this thing, pardon the pun, to make sure that those folks have access and coverage,” she told The Hill.

Republicans in the Senate are divided over how to handle Medicaid as part of their healthcare legislation.

While the issue wasn’t a priority in the House, it is sure to be divisive in the upper chamber.

Republicans representing states that did not expand Medicaid are keen to roll back the expansion, while those representing states that accepted it are split. Some want to preserve the expansion in some form, and GOP governors who expanded the program don’t want to see health coverage taken away from thousands of their constituents.

Portman said he’s been working with Capito on the issue, and senators from states that expanded Medicaid have been holding meetings since February.

Possible solutions, according to Portman, include creating a smoother transition to ending the expansion, as opposed to the House bill’s deadline of 2020. Financial assistance — in the form of tax credits — could be increased to better help those coming off the Medicaid rolls afford health insurance in the private market.

Additionally, new money could be targeted toward states with the worst opioid addiction rates to help fund treatment facilities, services and prevention efforts, according to Capito.

¨We’re just trying to be sure, at a time when we’re facing this crisis, that we don’t make things worse,” said Portman, who highlighted the issue in his reelection campaign and is the -co-author of the bipartisan Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act signed into law last year.

This effort came as the rate of deaths from opioid overdoses has quadrupled since 1999.

Advocates are concerned.

“Low-income, childless adults who are living with addiction are among the people hardest hit by the epidemic,” said Rebecca Farley, vice president for policy and advocacy at the National Council for Behavioral Health. “These are people who wouldn’t qualify for Medicaid otherwise.  … This is, in many ways, an overlooked ripple effect of the cuts that are being proposed in this bill.”

According to one advocate, who asked not to be named in order to more freely discuss strategy, meetings between advocates and senators who may be sympathetic to the issue are on the books for this week. This includes with the offices of Sens. Dean HellerDean Arthur HellerNevada senators urge airlines to enact new policies after Las Vegas shooting Dems plan to make gun control an issue in Nevada GOP establishment doubts Bannon’s primary powers MORE (R-Nev.), Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerRepublicans jockey for position on immigration Bipartisan bill would toughen North Korea sanctions, require Trump's strategy GOP senators push for delay of ObamaCare insurer tax MORE (R-Colo.), Dan Sullivan (R-Alaska), Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsGun proposal picks up GOP support Giffords, Scalise highlight party differences on guns Agricultural trade demands investment in MAP and FMD MORE (R-Maine), Murkowski, Capito and Portman.

If Republicans don’t find a solution, it’s easy to imagine Democratic attack ads accusing the GOP of taking away treatment for those with a drug disorder.

“I think even Republicans in the Senate would be hesitant about cutting a program on which families depend who have members in recovery and getting addiction treatment in the midst of an opioid epidemic,” Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseDem senator: 'How many lives must be lost before we act?' Sen. Manchin won’t vote for Trump’s mine safety nominee Overnight Regulation: SEC chief grilled over hack | Dems urge Labor chief to keep Obama overtime rule | Russia threatens Facebook over data storage law MORE (D-R.I.) said.