Where Dems stand on Sanders's single-payer bill

Sen. Bernie SandersBernard (Bernie) SandersPollster: Despite flashy headline, Dems haven't become more supportive of socialism Pollster: Dem party 'rift' won't carry on to midterms Pelosi sees defections from an unusual quarter — the left MORE (I-Vt.) is set to release his long-awaited “Medicare for all” bill Wednesday afternoon with the backing of a number of prominent Democrats.

Sanders has championed single-payer healthcare for decades, but the idea is catching fire among Democrats following his strong run for the White House in 2016.

Several Democrats who could run for the White House in 2020 — a category that includes Sanders — are expected to appear at the bill’s unveiling Wednesday afternoon. The bill garnered 16 co-sponsors hours before it was set to be introduced.

Still, not everyone is on board with the Sanders plan. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), for instance, said Tuesday she is focused on protecting ObamaCare. 

Here’s where Senate Democrats stand so far:

Supports (16)

Tammy BaldwinTammy Suzanne BaldwinTrump touts GOP election wins: ‘We have the team we want’ The Hill's Morning Report — GOP seeks to hold Trump’s gains in Midwest states Dems make history in Tuesday's primaries MORE (Wis.): Baldwin, who is up for reelection in 2018, will be a co-sponsor of the legislation. “With this reform, we would simplify a complicated system for families and reduce administrative costs for businesses. It would expand coverage to all the uninsured, make health care more affordable for working, middle-class families and reduce growing prescription drug costs for taxpayers,” Baldwin wrote in an op-ed in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.

Richard Blumenthal (Conn.):
On Tuesday afternoon, Blumenthal tweeted: “Proud to announce my support for single-payer #MedicareForAll led by @SenSanders. Let's make healthcare a right, not a luxury.”

Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDemocrats embracing socialism is dangerous for America Kavanaugh recommended against Clinton indictment in 1998: report Kavanaugh once said president would likely have to testify before grand jury if subpoenaed: report MORE (N.J.): Booker will also sign on as a co-sponsor, and is another Democrat seen as possible 2020 contender. "This is something that’s got to happen. ObamaCare was a first step in advancing this country, but I won’t rest until every American has a basic security that comes with having access to affordable health care," Booker told the NJTV News Monday. 

Al FrankenAlan (Al) Stuart FrankenThe Hill's Morning Report — GOP seeks to hold Trump’s gains in Midwest states Dems make history in Tuesday's primaries Tina Smith defeats former Bush ethics lawyer in Minnesota Dem primary MORE (Minn.): Franken called Sanders's proposal "a starting point" and "an important marker" toward the goal of universal coverage, while calling for "bipartisan policies that improve our current health care system" in the short term.

Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandTrump, Obamas and Clintons among leaders mourning Aretha Franklin Gillibrand urges opposition to Kavanaugh: Fight for abortion rights 'is now or never' Lewandowski says Bloomberg would be 'very competitive' against Trump in 2020 MORE (N.Y.): Seen as possible 2020 presidential contender, Gillibrand announced Tuesday that she would co-sponsor Sanders’s bill. “Health care is a right, not a privilege. This week, I'll proudly join Senator @BernieSanders to co-sponsor Medicare for All,” she tweeted.

Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisOvernight Health Care: Arkansas Medicaid work rules could cost thousands coverage | Record number of overdose deaths in 2017 | Dems demand immediate reunification of separated children Senate Dems demand immediate reunification of remaining separated children Lewandowski says Bloomberg would be 'very competitive' against Trump in 2020 MORE (Calif): Harris will also co-sponsor the legislation, she announced in a town hall in late August. "I intend to co-sponsor the 'Medicare for all' bill because it’s just the right thing to do," said Harris, another Democrat seen as having White House ambitions. "It's not just about what is morally and ethically right, it also makes sense just from a fiscal standpoint.”

Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichThe Hill's Morning Report — GOP seeks to hold Trump’s gains in Midwest states Gary Johnson launches New Mexico Senate bid Hillicon Valley: 'QAnon' conspiracy theory jumps to primetime | Senate Intel broadens look into social media manipulation | Senate rejects push for more election security funds | Reddit reveals hack MORE (N.M.): Heinrich announced Tuesday that he would co-sponsor the bill, saying, “It is time to recognize that health care is a human right and I believe that the best way to make that a reality in our nation is to build on what we all know works."

Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump heads to New York to shore-up GOP districts They knew it would cause lasting harm, and still took children from parents Dem strategist: It's 'far-left thinking' to call for Nielsen's resignation MORE (Hawaii): She announced her support Tuesday, tweeting “I support universal, affordable, accessible and quality health care as a right, not a privilege. A single payer, Medicare for All system is a strong articulation of this principle, which is why I support this bill.” 

Patrick LeahyPatrick Joseph LeahySenate returns to work on toughest 'minibus' yet GOP senator: Trump is ‘the only one in the government’ not paying attention to Russian threat to midterms Hillicon Valley: 'QAnon' conspiracy theory jumps to primetime | Senate Intel broadens look into social media manipulation | Senate rejects push for more election security funds | Reddit reveals hack MORE (Vt.): Sanders’s colleague from Vermont is also a co-sponsor of the legislation.

Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyDems urge tech companies to remove 3D-gun blueprints Make the moon a refueling station — then head to Mars Dems push FEMA on housing help for displaced Puerto Ricans MORE (Mass.): Markey announced last week that he would cosponsor the bill. On Tuesday, he tweeted: “#Healthcare is a right, not a privilege!”

Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyBipartisanship alive and well, protecting critical infrastructure Overnight Defense: Senate sends 7B annual defense bill to Trump's desk | US sanctions Turkish officials over detained pastor | Korean War remains headed to Hawaii | Senators reassure allies on NATO support Dem strategist: It's 'far-left thinking' to call for Nielsen's resignation MORE (Ore.): Merkley, the only senator to endorse Sanders during the 2016 primary, will also co-sponsor the legislation, he announced Monday. “Right now, our health care system is incredibly complex, fragmented, and stressful. It would be terrific to have a simple, seamless system where, solely by virtue of living in America, you know that you will get the care you need." 

Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzGOP leader criticizes Republican senators for not showing up to work Senate takes shot at Trump, passes resolution affirming 'press is not the enemy of the people' Pentagon’s No. 2 official: Trump’s ‘Space Force’ could cost 'billions' MORE (Hawaii): Schatz is also a cosponsor of the bill.

Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenBusinesses fear blowback from Russia sanctions bill Hillicon Valley: Trump officials deliver show of force on election security | Apple hits trillion | How fake Facebook groups manipulated real activists | Senate group seeks new Russia sanctions Senators introduce bill to slap 'crushing' new sanctions on Russia MORE (N.H.): Shaheen announced her support on Wednesday, tweeting: "I've signed-on to the Medicare For All Act introduced by @SenSanders."

Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallCourt orders Trump EPA to ban controversial pesticide Top Dems: Trump tweet telling Sessions to end Mueller probe was obstruction of justice Dem senators introduce resolution calling on Trump to stop attacking the press MORE (N.M.): In a statement released Tuesday, Udall announced he would co-sponsor the legislation. “I believe that health care is a human right, and that all New Mexicans — and all Americans — should be able to see a doctor when they’re sick."

Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenOn The Money: Turkey slaps more tariffs on US goods | Businesses fear blowback from Russia sanctions bill | Senate turns to toughest 'minibus' yet Warren introduces Accountable Capitalism Act Lewandowski says Bloomberg would be 'very competitive' against Trump in 2020 MORE (Mass.): Also considered a potential 2020 presidential candidate, Warren said last week that she would co-sponsor the legislation. "I believe it’s time to take a step back and ask: what is the best way to deliver high quality, low cost health care to all Americans?" Warren said in a statement.

Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseOvernight Defense: Officials make show of force on election security | Dems want probe into Air Force One tours | Pentagon believes Korean War remains 'consistent' with Americans Dems call for investigation of Trump Air Force One tours Dem senators introduce resolution calling on Trump to stop attacking the press MORE (R.I.): Whitehouse said in a statement this week that he would co-sponsor the legislation. “We have come a long way under Obamacare, but I still hear from Rhode Island families and small business owners that health care costs are too high. I am committed to bringing down those costs while improving the quality of care for Rhode Islanders,” he said.
 

Undecided (5)

Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperSenate panel spars with Trump administration over treatment of unaccompanied immigrant children Senate study: Trump hasn’t provided adequate support to detained migrant children Overnight Energy: Trump elephant trophy tweets blindsided staff | Execs of chemical plant that exploded during hurricane indicted | Interior to reverse pesticide ban at wildlife refuges MORE (Del.): The Delaware senator said the single-payer idea deserves a hearing. "Right now we're trying to focus on the main thing. And ... the main thing is to stabilize the exchanges. Do that now. The idea of 'Medicare for all,' the proposal from Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham: Flynn should lose security clearance Press needs to restore its credibility on FBI and Justice Department Trump, Obamas and Clintons among leaders mourning Aretha Franklin MORE and Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyEnergy Department clears ‘small-scale’ natural gas exports for fast approval GOP senators introduce resolution endorsing ICE Lawmakers pitch dueling plans for paid family leave MORE, these are ideas, big ideas ... those are the kinds of ideas that should have a full-blown hearing."

Bob CaseyRobert (Bob) Patrick CaseyTop Koch official fires back at critics: We are not an 'appendage' of the GOP Dem senator: Media should stop covering Trump rallies like they're breaking news The Hill's Morning Report: Trump tries to rescue Ohio House seat as GOP midterm fears grow MORE Jr. (Pa.): When asked his thoughts on the bill, Casey said he hasn't yet seen it and would like hearings on the proposal. He said a "giant step forward" in increasing coverage — that could be implemented now — would be adding a public option to compete alongside private plans. Casey is up for reelection next year.

Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinSchumer to meet with Kavanaugh on Tuesday Supreme Court nomination reignites abortion fights in states Kavanaugh has 'productive' meeting with key swing votes MORE (W.Va.): Manchin told The Hill he thinks the idea of single-payer care should be explored, but wouldn't specifically commit to the Sanders bill. "Let it go through the committee, let it go through the process. I don't just know enough about it. I'm not signing on to a piece of legislation that I don't have any idea what it's going to do to the economy, to the access and to people's care."

Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerReforms can stop members of Congress from using their public office for private gain Election Countdown: GOP worries House majority endangered by top of ticket | Dems make history in Tuesday's primaries | Parties fight for Puerto Rican vote in Florida | GOP lawmakers plan 'Freedom Tour' Senate Democrats should stop playing politics on Kavanaugh MORE (N.Y.): The Senate minority leader says, "there are are many different bills out there. There are many good ones." At his biweekly press conference on Tuesday, Schumer declined to say if he would be signing onto Sanders's proposal. He noted that other Democratic senators have put forth health care bills: "We want to move the issue forward. We're looking at all of these."

Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenTrump draws bipartisan fire over Brennan New sanctions would hurt Russia — but hurt American industry more Dems ask Mnuchin to probe Russian investment in state election tech MORE (Md.): He said he needs to examine the legislation once it's introduced. "I support making sure that we have a system of universal, affordable health care. There's going to be other proposals introduced. I've always supported moving in the direction of 'Medicare for all,' I've just got to look at the details," he told reporters Tuesday


Not endorsing (4)

Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineSenate GOP candidate Corey Stewart called kneeling football players ‘thugs’ Voters will punish Congress for ignoring duty on war and peace Election Countdown: GOP worries House majority endangered by top of ticket | Dems make history in Tuesday's primaries | Parties fight for Puerto Rican vote in Florida | GOP lawmakers plan 'Freedom Tour' MORE (Va.): Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonPapadopoulos's wife wants him to scrap plea deal with Mueller: report FBI chief: I'm trying to bring 'normalcy' in 'turbulent times' Senate Intel chief slams ex-CIA director for timing of claims about Trump-Russia ties MORE’s former running mate said he would “rather open it up to more choices, not fewer.” Kaine told reporters that he favors adding a public option to the mix of health care insurance policies Americans can choose. He offered support for the introduction of the bill, saying “Look, we have to have all the ideas on the table, so we can flesh them out.”

Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillSchumer to meet with Kavanaugh on Tuesday GOP leader criticizes Republican senators for not showing up to work Election Countdown: GOP worries House majority endangered by top of ticket | Dems make history in Tuesday's primaries | Parties fight for Puerto Rican vote in Florida | GOP lawmakers plan 'Freedom Tour' MORE (Mo.): McCaskill, who is considered vulnerable in next year’s election, told reporters, “I think that particular proposal is premature.” Additionally, she said she supports letting people between the ages of 55 and 65 buy into Medicare and other public option ideas.

Debbie StabenowDeborah (Debbie) Ann StabenowTrump draws bipartisan fire over Brennan The farm bill gives Congress a chance to act on the Pet and Women Safety (PAWS) Act Michigan county investigating ballot shortage in election MORE (Mich.): Stabenow, who is up for reelection in 2018, told reporters she supports letting those 55 and older buy into Medicare.

Jon TesterJonathan (Jon) TesterPearl Jam criticized for poster featuring dead Trump, burning White House Montana GOP Senate hopeful touts Trump's support in new ad Vulnerable Dems side with Warren in battle over consumer bureau MORE (Mont.): Tester told reporters he won’t be supporting Sanders’s legislation. “I support fixing what we got because I think that’s more likely to happen.” Tester is up for reelection in 2018 in what’s likely to be a tight race.

– Sylvan Lane contributed.

Updated: Sept. 13 at 12:20 p.m.