Collins: 'Disappointing' that bipartisan health-care effort was halted

Collins: 'Disappointing' that bipartisan health-care effort was halted
© Greg Nash

Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSenate Gang of Four to meet next week on immigration Republicans agree — it’s only a matter of time for Scott Pruitt Skyrocketing insulin prices provoke new outrage MORE (R-Maine) said Wednesday that it was "disappointing" a bipartisan health-care effort was halted after the White House threw its support behind a measure pushed by Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSenate panel advances three spending bills Trump says he will sign executive order to end family separations Trump backs narrow bill halting family separations: official MORE (R-S.C.) and Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyOn The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Supreme Court allows states to collect sales taxes from online retailers | Judge finds consumer bureau structure unconstitutional | Banks clear Fed stress tests Overnight Health Care — Presented by the Association of American Medical Colleges —Dems, health groups demand immigrant children be quickly reunited with families Overnight Health Care — Presented by the Association of American Medical Colleges — Key ObamaCare groups in limbo | Opioids sending thousands of kids into foster care | House passes bill allowing Medicaid to pay for opioid treatments MORE (R-La.). 

In an interview with CNN, Collins said she had not yet decided whether she will vote for the Graham-Cassidy bill, which seeks to end federal ObamaCare insurance subsidies and Medicaid expansion and replace them with block grants to states.

Collins said she is waiting for the Congressional Budget Office to release a partial analysis of the Graham-Cassidy bill before she makes a decision on it.

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But she acknowledged that she preferred an effort by the top Republican and Democrat on the Senate Health Committee to stabilize the individual insurance market and fix the problems with ObamaCare, rather than repeal it outright.

Sen. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderOn The Money — Sponsored by Prudential — Supreme Court allows states to collect sales taxes from online retailers | Judge finds consumer bureau structure unconstitutional | Banks clear Fed stress tests Supreme Court rules states can require online sellers to collect sales tax 13 GOP senators ask administration to pause separation of immigrant families MORE (R-Tenn.), chairman of the Health Committee, said Tuesday that the efforts had come to a standstill after Democrats and Republicans were unable to reach a deal that could pass in the Senate.

"It's disappointing that this bipartisan effort — which should be our approach — was not allowed to proceed to conclusion," Collins said.

In addition to Collins, Sens. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiIcebreaking ships are not America’s top priority in the Arctic 13 GOP senators ask administration to pause separation of immigrant families Trump plan to claw back billion in spending in peril MORE (R-Alaska) and John McCainJohn Sidney McCainDon’t disrespect McCain by torpedoing his clean National Defense Authorization Act Meghan McCain rips Trump's 'gross' line about her dad Trump's America fights back MORE (R-Ariz.) are also said to remain undecided on the Graham-Cassidy bill. The three Republicans voted against a slimmed-down ObamaCare repeal bill in late July, throwing a wrench in the GOP's efforts to do away with the health-care law.

Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP senators call for probe of federal grants on climate change Overnight Health Care — Presented by the Association of American Medical Colleges — Key ObamaCare groups in limbo | Opioids sending thousands of kids into foster care | House passes bill allowing Medicaid to pay for opioid treatments US watchdog: 'We failed' to stem Afghan opium production MORE (R-Ky.) has already indicated he will not vote for the Graham-Cassidy bill, arguing that it does not go far enough to repeal ObamaCare