New Mexico Gov: GOP health care bill 'still needs some work'

New Mexico Gov: GOP health care bill 'still needs some work'

New Mexico’s Republican governor is not yet persuaded to support the latest GOP effort to repeal ObamaCare.

“While it’s encouraging that Congress is working on a healthcare solution, the governor is concerned this bill could hurt New Mexico and still needs some work,” a spokesman for Gov. Susana Martinez told The Albuquerque Journal.

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The comments come as Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGraham: Trump will 'end North Korea’s threat to the American homeland' in his first term Sunday shows preview: Lawmakers weigh in after Texas school shooting Kim Jong Un surprises with savvy power plays MORE (R-S.C.) and Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyGOP, Dem lawmakers come together for McCain documentary Graham working on new ObamaCare repeal bill GOP senator says US should 'confiscate' money from Mexican cartels to build border wall MORE (R-La.) push legislation that would repeal much of ObamaCare by converting funds into block grants for states.

Joseph Cueto, Martinez’s spokesman, added that the governor thinks a health-care push should be bipartisan.

“She believes we need a bipartisan approach that focuses on the insurance market to make health care affordable,” he said.

The legislation has yet to garner the 50 Republican votes needed for a tiebreaker by Vice President Pence, while Senate Democrats have blasted the bill and argued it will hurt Americans.

New Mexico’s senators, who are both Democrats, have slammed the bill. Sen. Tom UdallThomas (Tom) Stewart UdallOvernight Energy: Pruitt taps man behind 'lock her up' chant for EPA office | Watchdog to review EPA email policies | Three Republicans join climate caucus Pruitt hires outside attorney as investigations mount: report Overnight Energy: Pruitt gets Senate grilling | Dems want investigation into Pruitt's security chief | Interior officers arrested 13 in border surge | Advisers pan science 'transparency' plan MORE called the bill “mean-spirited,” while Sen. Martin HeinrichMartin Trevor HeinrichHillicon Valley: AT&T calls hiring Cohen a 'big mistake' | Wyden wants to block DHS nominee over Stingray surveillance | Amazon pressed on child privacy | One year anniversary of Trump cyber order Moment of truth for Trump pick to lead CIA Puerto Rico's electric grid under scrutiny as new hurricane season looms MORE said it is a “disaster.”