FEATURED:

Democrat on Trump pre-existing condition claims: 'This is a lie'

Democrat on Trump pre-existing condition claims: 'This is a lie'
© Greg Nash

Sen. Chris MurphyChristopher (Chris) Scott MurphyLawmakers feel pressure on guns Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks Kasich’s campaign website tones down gun language after Florida shooting MORE (D-Conn.) on Wednesday pushed back against statements by Senate Republicans and President Trump that the latest GOP effort to repeal and replace ObamaCare includes protections for pre-existing conditions.

"This is a lie. A horrible knowing fabrication," Murphy tweeted Wednesday night. "The bill is intentionally constructed to force states to drop this protection."

ADVERTISEMENT
His comments came after Trump tweeted he wouldn't sign a health care bill if it didn't include these protections.

"I would not sign Graham-Cassidy if it did not include coverage of pre-existing conditions," Trump tweeted Wednesday night. "It does! A great Bill. Repeal & Replace."

The Senate could vote on the latest ObamaCare repeal-and-replace plan next week.

The proposal, sponsored by Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamCongress punts fight over Dreamers to March Pence tours Rio Grande between US and Mexico GOP looks for Plan B after failure of immigration measures MORE (R-S.C.) and Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyTo lower prescription drug prices, fix existing drug discount programs Kimmel writer tweets amount NRA has given lawmakers in response to shooting prayers Overnight Regulation: Trump unveils budget | Sharp cuts proposed for EPA, HHS | Trump aims to speed environmental reviews | Officials propose repealing most of methane leak rule MORE (R-La.), would largely dismantle ObamaCare and convert its funding to block grants that would be delivered to states, which could then spend the funding on their own health needs.

The debate over pre-existing conditions centers on a provision that allows states to waive an ObamaCare rule that prevents people with pre-existing condition from being charged higher premiums due to an illness. Critics of the bill argue that if states waived the rule, coverage could become unaffordable for people with pre-existing conditions.

Cassidy and Graham have pushed back against claims that their bill would hurt people with health problems.

Cassidy says states would have to show how they are providing "adequate and affordable" coverage to people with pre-existing conditions before waiving the ObamaCare rule.