AARP: Older Americans to pay $16K more under GOP ObamaCare repeal

A new study from the AARP finds that older people could pay as much as $16,174 more per year for health coverage under the Republican bill to repeal ObamaCare sponsored by Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamHouse GOP sets three FBI interviews in Clinton probe Trump on collision course with Congress on ZTE The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — GOP centrists in striking distance of immigration vote MORE (R-S.C.) and Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidySenate GOP urges Trump administration to work closely with Congress on NAFTA GOP, Dem lawmakers come together for McCain documentary Graham working on new ObamaCare repeal bill MORE (R-La.).

The bill “threatens to make health care unaffordable and inaccessible for millions of older Americans,” AARP, which opposes the measure, writes in the report.

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The study finds that on average nationwide, a 60-year-old making $25,000 per year would have to pay as much as $16,174 more per year for health insurance. That is a result of the possible elimination of two kinds of ObamaCare subsidies, which help people afford their premiums and out of pocket costs. 

The bill gives states wide leeway on how they spend a new block grant under the bill, so it is possible that some states could keep some of this subsidy funding, which would lessen the increase in costs.

The study singles out certain states as having even higher potential cost increases than the national average. In particular AARP points to Alaska, home to Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiOvernight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — VA reform bill heads to Trump's desk Senators introduce bill to measure progress in opioid fight Dems win nail-biter in charity congressional soccer game MORE, a key vote, and Arizona, home to Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainSenate panel advances 6B defense policy bill McCain: Trump pardoning Jack Johnson 'closes a shameful chapter in our nation’s history' Trump pardons late boxing champion Jack Johnson MORE, another crucial vote.

A 60-year-old making $25,000 per year in Alaska would have to pay as much as $31,790 more per year, and in Arizona, the person would have to pay $22,074 more, according to the AARP study.

“This increase is simply unaffordable,” the study says.