Pelosi: Democrats will 'put a stake in the heart' of ObamaCare repeal after McCain opposition

Pelosi: Democrats will 'put a stake in the heart' of ObamaCare repeal after McCain opposition
© Greg Nash

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) on Friday praised Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump's dangerous Guantánamo fixation will fuel fire for terrorists Tech beefs up lobbying amid Russia scrutiny Ad encourages GOP senator to vote 'no' on tax bill MORE's (R-Ariz.) announcement that he would not support the latest GOP effort to repeal and replace ObamaCare and pledged Democrats will "put a stake in the heart of this monstrous bill."

In a letter to Democrats, Pelosi touted McCain's decision as "good news."

But she also cast Democrats' health-care fight against Republicans as ongoing, urging lawmakers and advocacy groups to keep pressure on GOP lawmakers and the discussion in front of the public.

"Together, we will finally put a stake in the heart of this monstrous bill," Pelosi wrote.

The letter came after McCain said that he could not support a measure authored by Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamAlabama election has GOP racing against the clock Graham on Moore: 'We are about to give away a seat' key to Trump's agenda Tax plans show Congress putting donors over voters MORE (R-S.C.) and Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyTrump met Senate Republicans on ObamaCare fix Senate GOP tax bill will include repeal of ObamaCare mandate Alabama GOP chair warns party officials against write-in campaign MORE (R-La.), which sought to repeal much of the Affordable Care Act by replacing certain provisions, like Medicaid subsidies, with block grants controlled by states.

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While several other Senate Republicans remain undecided, McCain's announcement dealt a potentially deciding blow to the proposal.

Republicans could only afford two defections on the bill to get the 50 votes necessary for it to pass. But Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulCongress must end American support for Saudi war in Yemen Black men get longer prison sentences than white men for same crimes: study Sarah Palin on sexual harassment: 'People know I'm probably packing' so they 'don't mess with me' MORE (R-Ky.) has already come out against the measure, and Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsStates fill family caregiver void left by Congress GOP senator: ObamaCare fix could be in funding bill Collins: Pass bipartisan ObamaCare bills before mandate repeal MORE (R-Maine) has indicated that she's leaning against supporting it.

McCain's decision could potentially prompt other Senate Republicans to come out in opposition. No Democrats are expected to vote for the measure.

The Graham-Cassidy bill is the GOP's latest push to repeal the Affordable Care Act, or ObamaCare, though they now face a procedural deadline of Sept. 30 to pass the bill with only 50 votes, assuming Vice President Pence would cast the tie-breaking vote.

After that, any health-care bill would require a filibuster-proof 60 votes — a majority that would require Democratic support.