Trump pessimistic on ObamaCare repeal: ‘That’s the end of that’

President Trump sounded a pessimistic note Monday on the latest GOP effort to repeal ObamaCare, and blamed Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainRomney forced into GOP primary for Utah Senate nomination Trump considering pardon for boxing legend after call from Sylvester Stallone GOP poised to advance rules change to speed up Trump nominees MORE (R-Ariz.) for costing his party a victory.

Trump did not give up all hope on the bill, but suggested it would not get the 50 votes — assuming a tie-breaking vote from Vice President Pence — it needed to clear the Senate because of opposition from McCain, Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsTrump aide: Mueller probe 'has gone well beyond' initial scope Trump attorney Cohen overshadows Mueller probe Collins: Comey should have waited to release his memoir MORE (R-Maine) and other Republicans.

“Looks like Susan Collins and some others who will vote against,” Trump said during an interview on the “Rick & Bubba” radio show. “We’re going to lose two or three votes and that’s the end of that.”

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Trump also criticized McCain, whose thumbs down killed a slimmed-down ObamaCare repeal bill in July, and who announced his opposition to the latest measure on Friday.

Trump said that “the only reason we don’t have” repeal is “because of John McCain.”

“What McCain has done is a tremendous slap in the face of the Republican party,” Trump said. “Without John McCain, we already have the health care.”

McCain on Friday said he “cannot in good confidence” vote for the latest ObamaCare repeal attempt from Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP sold Americans a bill of goods with tax reform law Republicans divided over legislation protecting Mueller Rand Paul under pressure as Pompeo hunts for votes MORE (R-S.C.) and Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyTrump has not invited Democrats, media to state dinner: report Republicans have a long way to go toward fully repealing ObamaCare Senators press administration on mental health parity MORE (R-La.). McCain took issue with the rushed nature of the bill, saying it did not go through the normal committee process.

Collins on Sunday said it was “very difficult” for her to imagine voting for the bill.

Republicans can only lose three votes. McCain and Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulGOP senator: Democratic opposition to Pompeo 'driven 100 percent by politics' Pompeo lacks votes for positive vote on panel CIA declassifies memo on nominee's handling of interrogation tapes MORE (R-Ky.) have both said they are opposed.

Senate Republicans need to pass the bill before Sept. 30. After this week, they will lose the ability to use special budgetary rules on ObamaCare repeal that prevent a Democratic filibuster, further dooming their effort.