CBO finds 'millions' will lose coverage from repeal bill

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projected Monday that the last-ditch GOP ObamaCare repeal bill would result in "millions" of people losing coverage. 

The agency did not give a specific number given a lack of time to do the analysis before a vote, but said the "direction of the effect is clear."

CBO said the reduction in coverage would be felt in three areas: in Medicaid, because the bill repeals ObamaCare's expansion of Medicaid; in private coverage, because the bill repeals subsidies that help people afford it; and because the mandate to have coverage would be repealed.

After the CBO analysis was released, Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsOvernight Tech: Judge blocks AT&T request for DOJ communications | Facebook VP apologizes for tweets about Mueller probe | Tech wants Treasury to fight EU tax proposal Overnight Regulation: Trump to take steps to ban bump stocks | Trump eases rules on insurance sold outside of ObamaCare | FCC to officially rescind net neutrality Thursday | Obama EPA chief: Reg rollback won't stand FCC to officially rescind net neutrality rules on Thursday MORE (R-Maine) told reporters she hoped senators could return to the bipartisan ObamaCare stabilization negotiations that were abruptly cut off last week.


Sens. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderOvernight Health Care: Trump health chief backs CDC research on gun violence | GOP negotiators meet on ObamaCare market fix | Groups sue over cuts to teen pregnancy program GOP negotiators meet on ObamaCare market fix 30 million people will experience eating disorders — the CDC needs to help MORE (R-Tenn.) and Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn Murray30 million people will experience eating disorders — the CDC needs to help Mulvaney remarks on Trump budget plan spark confusion Overnight Finance: Mulvaney sparks confusion with budget remarks | Trump spars with lawmakers on tariffs | Treasury looks to kill 300 tax regs | Intel chief's warning on debt MORE (D-Wash.) were in the midst of negotiations on a bill to stabilize the insurance markets, until they were abandoned so Republicans could concentrate on one last repeal effort .

"I would hope that work would be resumed very quickly, and we could go on to other issues in the ACA," Collins said. 

CBO predicted some states would charge those who are sick more money for health coverage. 

"CBO and JCT also anticipate that some states would allow insurers to set premiums on the basis of an individual’s health status," the analysis states. 
"However, the higher the expected health care costs, the higher the premiums would be; for some people, premiums would be a very large share of their income."
The CBO finds that spending under the bill would be $230 billion less from 2020 to 2026 compared to ObamaCare. 
The new block grants to states that the bill creates would help offset the coverage losses, but only partially, CBO found. 
The bill also would reduce deficits by more than $133 billion over 10 years, the CBO found, clearing a hurdle in qualifying for special rules to avoid a filibuster.