CBO finds 'millions' will lose coverage from repeal bill

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projected Monday that the last-ditch GOP ObamaCare repeal bill would result in "millions" of people losing coverage. 

The agency did not give a specific number given a lack of time to do the analysis before a vote, but said the "direction of the effect is clear."

CBO said the reduction in coverage would be felt in three areas: in Medicaid, because the bill repeals ObamaCare's expansion of Medicaid; in private coverage, because the bill repeals subsidies that help people afford it; and because the mandate to have coverage would be repealed.

After the CBO analysis was released, Sen. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsDem infighting erupts over Supreme Court pick McConnell: Senate to confirm Kavanaugh by Oct. 1 Overnight Health Care: Watchdog finds Tom Price improperly used funds on flights | Ex-Novartis CEO sent drug pricing proposal to Cohen | HHS staffers depart after controversial social media posts MORE (R-Maine) told reporters she hoped senators could return to the bipartisan ObamaCare stabilization negotiations that were abruptly cut off last week.

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Sens. Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderSens introduce bipartisan bill matching Zinke proposed maintenance backlog fix Supreme Court vacancy throws Senate battle into chaos Overnight Health Care: Anti-abortion groups see chance to overturn Roe v. Wade with Kennedy retirement | HHS watchdog to probe detention center conditions | VA pick vows to oppose privatization MORE (R-Tenn.) and Patty MurrayPatricia (Patty) Lynn MurrayDems launch pressure campaign over migrant families Jane Fonda: Kavanaugh confirmation would be a 'catastrophe' Dems rip Trump DOJ nominee who represented Russian bank MORE (D-Wash.) were in the midst of negotiations on a bill to stabilize the insurance markets, until they were abandoned so Republicans could concentrate on one last repeal effort .

"I would hope that work would be resumed very quickly, and we could go on to other issues in the ACA," Collins said. 

CBO predicted some states would charge those who are sick more money for health coverage. 

 
"CBO and JCT also anticipate that some states would allow insurers to set premiums on the basis of an individual’s health status," the analysis states. 
 
"However, the higher the expected health care costs, the higher the premiums would be; for some people, premiums would be a very large share of their income."
 
The CBO finds that spending under the bill would be $230 billion less from 2020 to 2026 compared to ObamaCare. 
 
The new block grants to states that the bill creates would help offset the coverage losses, but only partially, CBO found. 
  
The bill also would reduce deficits by more than $133 billion over 10 years, the CBO found, clearing a hurdle in qualifying for special rules to avoid a filibuster.