Bipartisan Senate group opposes cuts to anti-drug office

Bipartisan Senate group opposes cuts to anti-drug office

Senators are urging the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and appropriators in the upper chamber to block major changes to an anti-drug office the Trump administration is reportedly weighing.

Last month, Politico reported that OMB was planning to propose moving two major grants at the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP). Under the plan, the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area and Drug-Free Communities programs would be moved to the Department of Justice and Department of Health and Human Services, respectively.

This would lead to a 95 percent cut to the ONDCP as an opioid crisis grips the nation.

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“Not only would such action signal to the American public that the Administration is not serious about addressing the drug epidemic that our nation currently faces, but it could also have a devastating effect on programs that have been proven effective,” a bipartisan group of about 12 senators from the Senate Caucus on International Narcotics Control and Judiciary Committee wrote in a letter to OMB Director Mick MulvaneyJohn (Mick) Michael MulvaneyTrump to nominate budget official as next consumer bureau chief Trump close to nominating CFPB chief: report On The Money: Trump imposes B in tariffs on China | China blasts 'fickle' Trump, promises payback | Trump to name consumer bureau director next week MORE on Thursday.

They also sent the letter to Sens. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoLawmakers prep for coming wave of self-driving cars Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — Dems want answers on DOJ ObamaCare decision Senate committee to vote on bill tackling maternal death rates next week MORE (R-W.Va.) and Christopher CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsHillicon Valley: Trump hits China with massive tech tariffs | Facebook meets with GOP leaders over bias allegations | Judge sends Manafort to jail ahead of trial | AT&T completes Time Warner purchase Dem senator: Trump Jr. may have given 'false testimony' about meeting with foreign nationals Overnight Finance: House sends Dodd-Frank rollbacks to Trump | What's in the bill | Trump says there is 'no deal' to help ZTE | Panel approves bill to toughen foreign investment reviews MORE (D-Del.), who lead the appropriations subcommittee in charge of ONDCP’s budget. Both senators opposed the possibility of a 95 percent cut last year.

Two GOP lawmakers signed the letter, Sen. John CornynJohn CornynMcConnell: Mueller 'ought to wrap it up' Senate rejects effort to boost Congress's national security oversight Graham jokes about Corker: GOP would have to be organized to be a cult MORE (Texas), the No. 2 Republican in the upper chamber, and Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyPruitt’s new problem with the GOP: Ethanol Overnight Health Care — Sponsored by PCMA — Dems see midterm advantage in new ObamaCare fight Senate Judiciary urges response to sexual harassment in federal courts MORE (Iowa). The rest were Democrats.

More than 150 groups have also come out in opposition to the changes.

The High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area program aims to help coordinate federal, state, local and tribal law enforcement in areas with high drug trafficking. The Drug-Free Communities program is a drug prevention effort that gives money to community coalitions to reduce substance abuse in youth.  

"Each of these programs is singularly focused on drugs," the senators wrote. "Moving them to other agencies without further examination could have negative consequences on local law enforcement and on the overall effectiveness of the programs."

The epidemic of prescription painkillers and heroin has been hitting the country hard, as opioid overdose deaths continue to rise. The rate of opioid overdose deaths increased 28 percent from 2015 to 2016, according to December data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In late October, President TrumpDonald John TrumpSunday Shows preview: Lawmakers, Trump allies discuss Russia probe, migrant family separation Seth McFarlane: Fox News makes me 'embarrassed' to work for this company  'Art of the Deal' co-author: Trump would act like Kim Jong Un if he had the same powers MORE declared the opioid epidemic a public health emergency, and the administration extended the declaration another 90 days in mid-January.

Many advocates have panned the declaration, however, saying it hasn’t yet lead to much of consequence. They urge more funding to be allocated to curb the crisis, which will seemingly be up for negotiation in a larger spending package.

This story was updated at 6:31 p.m.