Bipartisan bill would give DEA more power in setting opioid quotas

Bipartisan bill would give DEA more power in setting opioid quotas
© Greg Nash

A bipartisan group of senators introduced a bill Monday they said would strengthen the Drug Enforcement Administration's (DEA) ability to prevent opioid abuse. 

The bill would allow the DEA to take into consideration overdose deaths and abuse rates when it annually sets quotas for the number of Schedule I and II controlled substances, such as opioids, that can be manufactured and produced in the U.S. 

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Under current law, it can only consider factors like past sales and estimated demand.

“Every day, more than 100 Americans die from an opioid overdose. While we know that there are legitimate uses for opioid painkillers, we also know that these dangerous pills are being over-produced, over-prescribed and over-dispensed,” said Sen. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinDems seize on Kavanaugh emails to question role in terrorism response Trump gives thumbs up to prison sentencing reform bill at pivotal meeting Overnight Defense: Officials make show of force on election security | Dems want probe into Air Force One tours | Pentagon believes Korean War remains 'consistent' with Americans MORE (D-Ill.), one of the bill's sponsors. 

He said that while the DEA has taken steps to lower opioid quotas, "their ability to do so is limited." 

"Opioid quota reform is needed so DEA can take important factors like diversion and abuse into account when setting quotas, rather than chasing the downstream consequences of this crisis," Durbin said. 

Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinProgressives fume as Dems meet with Brett Kavanaugh GOP lawmaker calls on FBI to provide more info on former Feinstein staffer It’s possible to protect national security without jeopardizing the economy MORE (D-Calif.) and Republican Sens. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (La.) and Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyGillibrand urges opposition to Kavanaugh: Fight for abortion rights 'is now or never' National Archives distances itself from Bush team on Kavanaugh documents Overnight Health Care: Lawsuit challenges Arkansas Medicaid work requirements | CVS program targets high-cost drugs | Google parent invests in ObamaCare startup Oscar MORE (Iowa), all members of the Judiciary Committee, also signed onto the bill. 

Last week, Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsBrennan fires back at Trump: 'I will not relent' NYT columnist: A tape of Trump saying N-word could make his supporters like him more GOP’s midterm strategy takes shape MORE asked the DEA whether such changes are necessary. 

“Given the urgency of this crisis, with an estimated 175 Americans dying per day, we need the DEA to act quickly to determine if changes are needed in the quotas,” Sessions wrote in a memo.

Changes could also be made without Congress through the administrative rule-making process. 

Durbin noted that the DEA approved "significant" increases in opioid production quotas between 1993 and 2015, including a 39-fold increase for oxycodone and a 12-fold increase for hydrocodone.