Cruz still a no on ObamaCare repeal bill

Cruz still a no on ObamaCare repeal bill
© Greg Nash

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzDebbie Wasserman Schultz marks 10 years as breast cancer survivor Foreign agent registration is no magical shield against Russian propaganda Let Trump be Trump and he'll sail through 2020 MORE (R-Texas) is still opposed to the latest ObamaCare repeal legislation despite the changes that have been made to the bill, according to a Cruz aide.

Cruz's position further endangers the Republican ObamaCare repeal effort, which appears to be on the brink of failure.

The Texan is the third senator to publicly oppose the bill, sponsored by Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP and Dems bitterly divided by immigration We are running out of time to protect Dreamers US trade deficit rises on record imports from China MORE (R-S.C.) and Bill CassidyWilliam (Bill) Morgan CassidyTax bill could fuel push for Medicare, Social Security cuts Collins to vote for GOP tax plan Overnight Tech: Lawmakers want answers on Uber breach | Justices divided in patent case | Tech makes plea for net neutrality on Cyber Monday MORE (R-La.). Senate Republicans can only lose two votes and still pass the bill; Sens. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulLexington mayor launches bid for Congress Trump-free Kennedy Center Honors avoids politics Meet the Iran hawk who could be Trump's next secretary of State MORE (R-Ky.) and John McCainJohn Sidney McCainGOP strategist donates to Alabama Democrat Meghan McCain knocks Bannon: 'Who the hell are you' to criticize Romney? Dems demand Tillerson end State hiring freeze, consult with Congress MORE (R-Ariz.) are already opposed.

Cruz on Sunday said he wants to get to "yes," but is not there yet.

"Right now they don't have my vote, and I don't think they have [Sen.] Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeSupreme Court takes on same-sex wedding cake case House approves motion to go to tax conference — with drama Trump really will shrink government, starting with national monuments MORE's [R-Utah] either," Cruz said.

On Monday, senior Cruz aides said the senator's position hasn't changed.

Cruz wants to get to "yes," but is not there yet, they said.

The bill “needs to lower costs for consumers, and we are going to keep pushing for that.” 

According to aides, Cruz is interested in making changes to how insurers comply with “Title One” of ObamaCare, similar to an amendment he introduced to the repeal bill over the summer.

However, Cassidy on Monday said the the most recent version of the bill is the final one, aside from corrections to drafting errors.

The updated version of the repeal bill, released publicly Monday morning, includes more conservative regulatory policies designed to win over key holdouts.

Both Cruz and Sen. Mike Lee (R-Utah) have sounded optimistic about the Cassidy-Graham legislation, but have held back their full support.