Overnight Healthcare: House GOP fails to override veto of ObamaCare repeal

The House on Tuesday failed to override President Obama's veto of legislation that would have repealed much of ObamaCare and defunded Planned Parenthood.

The result was expected, given that an override would have required Democratic support to succeed, but Republicans praised the vote as showing what could happen next year if their party wins back the White House.

The veto override failed by a vote of 241 to 186.  

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"We have now forged a path that is a clear path to repealing ObamaCare without 60 votes in the Senate," Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanDem: Ex-lawmaker tried to pin me to elevator door and kiss me Two months later: Puerto Rico doesn’t have power, education or economy running again On Capitol Hill, few name names on sexual harassment MORE (R-Wis.) said Tuesday. "So what we are proving today is that if we have a Republican president next year, we will repeal ObamaCare and we will replace ObamaCare."

Democrats denounced the vote but agreed that it creates an election-year contrast.

"It certainly does indicate the stakes in the 2016 elections," said Rep. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.), who led Democrats in the floor debate over the measure.

Still, Democrats noted that if the repeal measure had actually become law, Republicans would have been confronted more directly with the question of how to replace ObamaCare and deal with the millions of people who would lose health coverage. Read more here: http://bit.ly/1PTjP95

HEALTH POLICY ON MENU FOR OBAMA, GOP LEADERS: No, you're not reading this wrong – healthcare issues are actually emerging as potential areas of compromise between Obama and Republicans.

The same day that House Republicans again moved to repeal the healthcare law, GOP leaders and the White House said they discussed the growing heroin epidemic, Vice President Biden's task force to fight cancer, and the threat of the Zika virus.

For the White House, two out of the five priority areas laid out during Tuesday's briefing were health-related.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellAlabama election has GOP racing against the clock McConnell PAC demands Moore return its money Klobuchar taking over Franken's sexual assault bill MORE (R-Ky.) said after the meeting that he urged the administration to step up the response to the Zika virus, which is expected to infect 4 million people globally this year.

"We need to get out in front of the Zika virus to make sure that we don't end up having the kind of feeling across the country that we're sort of reacting too late, like we did on Ebola," he said. Read more here: http://bit.ly/1VIEdYD

OBAMA WANTS $1 BILLION TO FIGHT OPIOID ADDICTION: The White House is seeking $1 billion in new funding over two years as part of a ramped-up fight against heroin and prescription drug abuse.

The funding request, which is likely to get some Republican support, comes as both parties put more emphasis on the opioid epidemic on the campaign trail.

Presidential hopefuls from both parties have recently elevated drug abuse on their platforms with the epidemic becoming a bigger problem in early-voting states Iowa and New Hampshire – something that White House spokesman Josh Earnest mentioned on Tuesday. Read more here: http://bit.ly/1X1j8tF

A GLIMPSE INTO THE ANTI-ABORTION WAR: Marjorie Dannenfelser, president of the Susan B. Anthony List, is one of the leading names in the fight against abortion. But 30 years ago, she would have driven other women to the abortion clinic – and she would have had one herself.

Describing Dannenfelser as a strong compromiser, Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamAlabama election has GOP racing against the clock Graham on Moore: 'We are about to give away a seat' key to Trump's agenda Tax plans show Congress putting donors over voters MORE (R-S.C.) points to last year, when she helped rescue a 20-week abortion ban bill from GOP infighting.

"That bill could have fallen apart," said Graham, who sponsored the Senate counterpart of the 20-week ban. "At a time, the pro-life movement was more of a debating society. Now, we're hitting on all cylinders." Read our profile here: http://bit.ly/1nDJaGU

COMMITTEE UPDATES:

Democrats on the House Oversight Committee on Tuesday released a summary of thousands of pages of documents from drug companies Valeant and Turing Pharmaceuticals.  Read the highlights from Valeant here: http://1.usa.gov/1KotuC7 and Turing here: http://1.usa.gov/1Kotyle.

ON TAP TOMORROW

The House Oversight Committee holds a hearing on the water crisis in Flint, Mich.

Heritage Action will host its third-annual conservative policy summit.

WHAT WE'RE READING:

Obama's $1 billion cancer 'moonshot' may not achieve orbit (Bloomberg)

What it's like to live with microcephaly, birth defect linked to Zika virus (Washington Post)

Hospitals find a way to say I'm sorry (Wall Street Journal)

IN THE STATES:

Indiana hospitals boosted by Medicaid expansion over last year (Indy Star)

Loophole in some states can help illegal immigrants get Medicaid (NY1)

State couldn't advertise for 'Healthy Michigan' Medicaid expansion under bill (MLive)

ICYMI FROM THE HILL:

Democrats pressure Ryan to disband Planned Parenthood committee http://bit.ly/1UHvzcL

Dems put forward alternative to GOP's mental health bill http://bit.ly/1PTcqXl

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