Senate revives defeated disabilities treaty

The Senate is reviving a UN disabilities treaty opposed by conservative home-schooling advocates following its narrow defeat last year.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman Robert MenendezRobert MenendezBipartisan group, Netflix actress back bill for American Latino Museum The Mideast-focused Senate letter we need to see Taiwan deserves to participate in United Nations MORE (D-N.J.) has scheduled a hearing for next week as he seeks to create new momentum for the bipartisan effort. Democrats are doubling down on their outreach to Republicans who support the effort, with Sen. Kelly AyotteKelly AyotteOPINION: Democracy will send ISIS to the same grave as communism Kelly Ayotte joins defense contractor's board of directors Week ahead: Comey firing dominates Washington MORE (R-N.H.) and Mark KirkMark KirkMcConnell: Senate to try to repeal ObamaCare next week GOP senator: Not 'appropriate' to repeal ObamaCare without replacement GOP's repeal-only plan quickly collapses in Senate MORE (R-Ill.) as their first witnesses.

The treaty fell five votes short of the two-thirds needed for ratification last year but advocates hope they can flip enough Republicans to pass it now that the divisive presidential election is over. Sen. Lamar AlexanderLamar AlexanderSenate panel rejects Trump funding cuts on Energy Department programs Governors-turned-senators meet to talk healthcare With healthcare bill derailed, GOP wonders: What now? MORE (R-Tenn.) at the time blamed bad timing for his “no” vote, and Sen. Thad CochranThad CochranOvernight Finance: GOP offers measure to repeal arbitration rule | Feds fine Exxon M for Russian sanctions violations | Senate panel sticks with 2017 funding levels for budget | Trump tax nominee advances | Trump unveils first reg agenda Senate committee ignores Trump, House budgets in favor of 2017 funding levels Overnight Finance: CBO finds 22M more uninsured under Senate health bill | GOP agrees ObamaCare taxes must go | Supreme Court to look at Dodd-Frank whistleblower protections | More tax reform hearings | Green light for partial travel ban | MORE (R-Miss.) changed his vote from “yes” to “no” after it became clear the treaty wouldn't pass.

The wheelchair-bound Kirk didn't take part in the vote, having suffered a stroke earlier in the year. Personal lobbying by former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kansas) – who attended the vote in his wheelchair on the Senate floor – failed to convince the 13 Republicans needed for ratification last year, but advocates hope a sitting senator will have more sway.

Opposition to the treaty has been spearheaded by former Sen. Rick Santorum (R-Penn.), who argues it could empower UN bureaucrats to challenge U.S. homeschooling. Advocates say the treaty would merely extend the protections of the Americans with Disabilities Act to people with disabilities around the world, including Americans living abroad, and have little to no impact on U.S. residents.

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