Lawmakers urge Obama to take hard stance with Putin during G20 summit

Lawmakers want President Obama to light into Russia's Vladimir Putin when the two meet on the margins of the G20 summit in Mexico on Monday.

The meeting, planned after Putin skipped this spring's G8 meeting at Camp David, marks the first time the two meet face-to-face since Putin regained the presidency in March.

ADVERTISEMENT
Since then relations between the two countries have only gone downhill, reaching a new low with this week's revelations that Russia is providing President Bashar Assad's forces in Syria with attack helicopters.

“I think that (Obama) should go to the meeting,” Sen. Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteExplaining Democratic victories: It’s gun violence, stupid Trump voter fraud panel member fights back against critics Dems plan to make gun control an issue in Nevada MORE (R-N.H.) told MSNBC this week, “and take a very, very hard line with Putin and be very clear to him that we are not going to accept Russia continuing to send arms to Syria and that there will be grave consequences to our relationship if they continue that.”

Others are equally adamant that Russia's continued support for Assad, despite mounting allegations of attacks against unarmed civilians and the risk of civil war, should be front and center.

“When you see what the Russians are doing in terms of sending helicopters to Syria, I think that should be the Number 1 point of discussion,” said Sen. John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoPruitt to testify on EPA agenda at House, Senate hearings Overnight Energy: Senate confirms top EPA air regulator | Feds to roll back emissions rule for big trucks | Defense bill mandates climate study Senate confirms top air regulator at EPA MORE (R-Wyo.), a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.


More from The Hill
• Immigration ruling ‘fully within’ Obama powers, says top adviser
• Obama adviser: GOP using security leaks as ‘distraction’
• Cuba trade backers pressure Castro over jailed US citizen
• White House fires back on war cuts, tells Congress to 'do its job'
• President Obama’s Hispanic gamble
• Obama, economy brace for Greek vote
• Climate activists target Justin Bieber Twitter record
• FCC mulls changing cellphone radiation standards
• US climate envoy: UN summit a priority despite Obama no-show


The administration has qualified Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonO’Malley tells Dems not to fear Trump FBI informant gathered years of evidence on Russian push for US nuclear fuel deals, including Uranium One, memos show Pelosi blasts California Republicans for supporting tax bill MORE's comments Wednesday about the helicopters, acknowledging that they had been sent to Russia to be refurbished and repaired but weren't new sales. The distinction didn't placate lawmakers, however.

“What’s the difference between them being new and them being sent to Moscow and have the blood washed off them and sent back?” Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainTrump's dangerous Guantánamo fixation will fuel fire for terrorists Tech beefs up lobbying amid Russia scrutiny Ad encourages GOP senator to vote 'no' on tax bill MORE (R-Ariz.), the top Republican on the Senate Armed Services committee, told The Hill. “I think the secretary of state might have been more specific that these are refurbished helicopters, but they’re still weapons that are massacring Syrians.”

Obama's top spokesman for national security affairs confirmed Friday that the two leaders will meet on Monday.

Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategic Communications Ben Rhodes said the “reset” between two countries had seen “very positive results” on everything from NATO supply routes to Afghanistan to sanctions on Iran to nuclear disarmament, but acknowledged a “very substantial difference” on the issue of Syria.

“We expect that the agenda for the meeting will cover a range of issues,” Rhodes said. “Syria will certainly be on the agenda of their meeting as well.”

The Republican dean on foreign affairs for his part urged Obama to stay “civil.”

“It's always advisable to meet with the Russians,” said Sen. Richard Lugar (R-Ind.). “I'm not going to prescribe what the agenda ought to be, but there are a host of things that could be discussed. Specifically right now, obviously, Syria and Iran come to mind, and the implementation of the new START Treaty.”

Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenQuestions loom over Franken ethics probe State Dept. spokeswoman acknowledges 'morale issue' Democrats scramble to contain Franken fallout  MORE (D-N.H.), a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, agreed.

“Clearly there are a lot of areas where we have overlapping interests and it's important to communicate,” she said. “I would not presume to tell the president what tone he should use.”

Jeremy Herb contributed