McCain: GOP letter to Iran not 'most effective' response

McCain: GOP letter to Iran not 'most effective' response
© Greg Nash

Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainEx-Montenegro leader fires back at Trump: ‘Strangest president' in history McCain: Trump plays into 'Putin's hands' by attacking Montenegro, questioning NATO obligations Joe Lieberman urges voters to back Crowley over Ocasio-Cortez in general MORE (R-Ariz.), one of the signers of the controversial letter to Iran’s leadership, admitted Tuesday night that the letter might not have been the way to express frustration that President Obama isn’t working with Congress on nuclear negotiations with Tehran.

“What that letter did was tell the Iranians that whatever deal they make, the Congress of the United States will play a role,” he said on Fox News’s “On the Record with Greta van Susteren.”

“Maybe that wasn’t the best way to do that, but I think the Iranians should know that the Congress of the United States has to play a role in whether an agreement of this magnitude.”

Sen. Tom CottonThomas (Tom) Bryant CottonBipartisan group introduces retirement savings legislation in Senate Overnight Defense: Fallout from tense NATO summit | Senators push to block ZTE deal in defense bill | Blackwater founder makes new pitch for mercenaries to run Afghan war Hillicon Valley: DOJ appeals AT&T-Time Warner ruling | FBI agent testifies in heated hearing | Uproar after FCC changes rules on consumer complaints | Broadcom makes bid for another US company | Facebook under fire over conspiracy sites MORE (R-Ark.) led the group of 47 GOP senators who signed the letter, which warned Iranian leadership that any deal that didn’t have congressional input could crumble in future years. A number of Democrats and foreign policy experts criticized it for trying to undermine the president.

President Obama, Vice President Biden, and former Secretary of State presumed presidential front-runner Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonState Dept: Russia’s allegations about American citizens ‘absolutely absurd’ Trump on possible sit-down with Mueller: 'I've always wanted to do an interview' Election Countdown: Senate, House Dems build cash advantage | 2020 Dems slam Trump over Putin presser | Trump has M in war chest | Republican blasts parents for donating to rival | Ocasio-Cortez, Sanders to campaign in Kansas MORE are among the high-profile Democrats who have publicly bashed the letter.

McCain blamed increasing partisanship for the conditions that spawned the letter. He pointed out the president’s unilateral action on immigration and normalizing the diplomatic relationship with Cuba as proof that the president has bucked working with Congress.

“It’s also symptomatic between the total lack of trust that exists now between we Republicans and the president,” he said.

“This has established a poisoned environment here which sometimes causes us to react maybe in not the most effective fashion.”