White House rules out repercussions for Palestinians after UN statehood vote

President Obama has no plans to cut U.S. aid to the Palestinian Authority following Thursday's statehood vote at the United Nations, White House spokesman Josh Earnest said Friday.

Earnest told reporters traveling with the president aboard Air Force One that Obama has no plans to withdraw Palestinian aid and added that no consequences he can talk about are under consideration. The U.N. General Assembly voted 138-9 to recognize Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas's Palestinian Liberation Organization as a non-member observer state over firm objections from the United States and Israel.

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The president, Earnest said, believes that a two-state solution can be achieved “only through face-to-face negotiations not unilateral actions.”

Some Republicans want to punish both Abbas, who is also known as Abu Mazen, and the U.N.

Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.), the chairwoman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, called on Congress to impose “severe economic consequences” for the U.N.'s “irresponsible” action. She said the United States should cut the $600 million in annual funding for the Palestinian Authority as well as any funding for U.N. agencies that recognize Palestine as a state.

“It’s crystal clear that Abu Mazen and his cronies are not partners for peace and do not value their relationship with the U.S.,” she said in a prepared statement. “The U.S must stand with our ally Israel and offer no U.S. taxpayer dollars and no political support for the PLO.”

And a bipartisan quartet of senators introduced legislation to cut off aid to the Palestinians if they use their new status to pursue criminal charges against Israel at the International Criminal Court. The bill would also shutter the PLO’s Washington office unless the president determines that the Palestinians are engaged in “meaningful negotiations” with Israel.

The bill is championed by Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey GrahamCNN to host town hall featuring John McCain, Lindsey Graham Club for Growth launches ad targeting GOP tax writer Dem senator asks for 'top to bottom' review of Syria policy MORE (R-S.C.), Charles SchumerCharles SchumerEllison holds edge in DNC race survey Overnight Cybersecurity: Trump defends Flynn, blasts leaks | Yahoo fears further breach Overnight Finance: Trump's Labor pick withdraws | Ryan tries to save tax plan | Trump pushes tax reform with retailers MORE (D-N.Y.), John BarrassoJohn BarrassoBig Pharma must address high drug prices A guide to the committees: Senate Making transportation public-private partnerships available in rural America MORE (R-Wyo.) and Robert MenendezRobert MenendezSteve Mnuchin, foreclosure king, now runs your US Treasury Senate Dems move to nix Trump's deportation order Senators to Trump: We support additional Iran sanctions MORE (D-N.J.) and is being offered as an amendment to the pending defense authorization bill in the Senate. The senators said Thursday they did not want to punish the Palestinians by immediately terminating the $600 million in annual U.S. aid in order to preserve the chance for a negotiated two-state solution with Israel.

“It's a very clear message to the Palestinians: the choice is yours,” Menendez said. “We could have pre-empted that choice. The choice is yours. If you return to a negotiation, we're good.”