Bachmann joins liberal Dems on bill denying arms to Syria

ADVERTISEMENT
Joining her on the bill are fellow Tea Party Republicans Jeff Duncan of South Carolina, liberal Democrats Rick Nolan of Minnesota and Peter WelchPeter WelchA bipartisan consensus against 'big pharma' is growing in Congress Dems push leaders to talk less about Russia House Dems slam Trump's 'betrayal' on drug pricing MORE of Vermont, and Reps. Scott DesJarlais (R-Tenn.) and Walter Jones (R-N.C.). The bill was introduced by Rep. Chris Gibson (R-N.Y.), one of the least conservative Republicans in Congress.

“This bipartisan legislation will ensure we can maintain our diplomatic and humanitarian efforts to support the Syrian people without getting drawn into another engagement,” Gibson said. “Moving forward, it is vital that Congress be a part of this debate and provide authorization prior to any hostile action or escalation of our involvement.”

Sens. Rand PaulRand PaulThree more GOP senators announce opposition to healthcare bill Rand Paul: Trump 'open to making bill better' Senate GOP delays ObamaCare repeal vote past recess MORE (R-Ky.) and Mike LeeMike LeeThree more GOP senators announce opposition to healthcare bill Senate GOP delays ObamaCare repeal vote past recess Club for Growth opposes Senate ObamaCare repeal bill MORE (R-Utah) partnered with Chris MurphyChris MurphySaudis say Qatar demands are non-negotiable Senate Dems step up protests ahead of ObamaCare repeal vote Dems push for more action on power grid cybersecurity MORE (D-Conn.) and Tom UdallTom UdallOvernight Finance: GOP divided over welfare cuts in budget | Lawmaker loses M on pharma stock he pitched | Yellen: No more financial crises in our lifetimes Overnight Regulation: EPA moves to repeal Obama water rule | Labor chief to review overtime rule | Record fine for Google EPA head faces skeptical senators on budget cuts MORE (D-N.M.) on lnearly identical legislation, barring the Obama administration from “supporting, directly or indirectly, military or paramilitary operations in Syria,” last week. The bill has an exemption for “non-lethal humanitarian assistance.”

Neither bill is likely to get much traction, despite polls showing 70 percent of Americans are wary of arming the rebels. Murphy, Udall and Paul were the only “no” votes when legislation to arm the rebels cleared the Senate Foreign Relations panel by a 15-3 vote last month.

Please send tips and comments to Julian Pecquet: jpecquet@thehill.com

Follow us on Twitter: @TheHillGlobal and @JPecquetTheHill