Paul defeated in bid to end Egypt aid

An effort by Sen. Rand PaulRand PaulGOP leader tempers ObamaCare expectations Senate gears up for fight on Trump's 0B Saudi Arabia arms sale Paul: 0B Saudi arms deal ‘a travesty’ MORE (R-Ky.) to freeze $1.5 billion in annual aid to Egypt went down to defeat on Wednesday.

Only 12 Republicans supported Paul's amendment to the transportation spending bill that would have allocated the foreign aid to Egypt for bridge repairs in the United States. The amendment was defeated in a 86-13 vote.

Paul argued that U.S. law requires the aid to be terminated in the case of a military coup, which he said happened when elected Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi was deposed on July 3.

Senators opposed to his amendment, Paul argued, were “voting against the rule of law.”

“It's not convenient now to obey the law that they passed,” he said.

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Backing the amendment from Paul was Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnellMitch McConnellFive goals for Republicans this summer GOP leader tempers ObamaCare expectations Week ahead: Senate faces difficult path to consensus on healthcare MORE (R-Ky.) as well as by a coalition of Tea Party and others proponents of government spending cuts, including Sens. Ted CruzTed CruzGOP leader tempers ObamaCare expectations Franken explains why he made an exception to diss Cruz in his book FEC faults Cruz on Goldman Sachs loans in rare unanimous vote MORE (R-Texas), Mike LeeMike LeeGOP leader tempers ObamaCare expectations Republicans go to battle over pre-existing conditions Senate gears up for fight on Trump's 0B Saudi Arabia arms sale MORE (R-Utah), Dean HellerDean HellerGOP leader tempers ObamaCare expectations Dems plot recess offensive on ObamaCare Trump got harsher GOP reception than Bush on budget MORE (R-Nev.), Tom CoburnTom Coburn'Path of least resistance' problematic for Congress Freedom Caucus saved Paul Ryan's job: GOP has promises to keep Don't be fooled: Carper and Norton don't fight for DC MORE (R-Okla.), Jerry MoranJerry MoranWeek ahead: Obama's CIA chief to testify on Russia probe IT modernization bill passes House Cost of key cyber bill drops by billions after revisions MORE (R-Kansas), James Risch (R-Idaho), Mike CrapoMike CrapoCongress should ‘phone a friend’ when sanctioning Russia Sherrod Brown looks to defy Trump trend in Ohio McConnell 'not optimistic' Dodd-Frank overhaul will happen MORE (R-Idaho), Mike EnziMike EnziFive takeaways from Trump's first budget proposal Eliminate Foreign Investment in Real Property Tax Act of 1980 to create jobs Trump releases budget that slashes government programs MORE (R-Wyo.), John BarrassoJohn BarrassoOvernight Finance: Dems introduce minimum wage bill | Sanders clashes with Trump budget chief | Border tax proposal at death's door Overnight Energy: Trump energy nominees face Congress | OPEC to extend production cuts Top GOP senators tell Trump to ditch Paris climate deal MORE (R-Wyo.), Charles GrassleyChuck GrassleySenators locked in turf battle over Russia probes Grassley calls for investigation into Chinese promotion of Kushner family company deal Dems plot recess offensive on ObamaCare MORE (R-Iowa) and John ThuneJohn ThuneCongress must address student loan debt crisis, a national economic drag Republicans go to battle over pre-existing conditions GOP frustrated by slow pace of Trump staffing MORE (R-S.D.).

Leaders on the Senate Armed Services and Foreign Relations argued at length against abruptly terminating aid to Egypt. They raised concerns, however, with the administration's decision to avoid saying whether Morsi's ouster was a coup; such a determination would have triggered an automatic aid freeze until the election of another president in Egypt.

Senate Foreign Relations chairman Robert MenendezRobert MenendezThe Mideast-focused Senate letter we need to see Taiwan deserves to participate in United Nations The way forward on the Iran nuclear deal under President Trump MORE (D-N.J.) said the vote on aid was “far too important a decision to be an afterthought to an appropriations bill.”

“We need a more nuanced approach, one that speaks to both our values and our interests,” Menendez said, “and which provides the president with the flexibility needed to conduct delicate and discriminating policy in a challenging and chaotic environment.”

The top Republican on the committee, Sen. Bob CorkerBob CorkerUncertainty builds in Washington over White House leaks Kushner 'sounds like he's more than glad' to answer questions, GOP senator says Sunday shows: Homeland Security chief hits the circuit after Manchester attack MORE (Tenn.), vowed to take up the legal issues of continued aid to Egypt when Congress returns in September.

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