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Trudeau first Canadian PM to speak to National Governors Association

Trudeau first Canadian PM to speak to National Governors Association
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Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will address U.S. governors at the 2017 summer meeting of the National Governors Association in Rhode Island this month.

“No countries share a closer bond than Canada and the United States. Each day, hundreds of thousands of people cross the border to work, travel or visit loved ones. Ever more integrated supply chains draw our economies closer together, bringing jobs and prosperity to Canadians and Americans alike,” Trudeau said in a statement.

“I will continue to work with all orders of the U.S. government to create good, middle class jobs on both sides of the border, and to find solutions to the challenges we face together,” he continued.

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The group said Friday that Trudeau will be the first Canadian prime minister in modern history to address the NGA, which meets twice a year.

The Canadian leader’s address is seen as an attempt to build stronger relations with U.S. governors as tensions appeared to have increased between the U.S. and its northern neighbor.

Trump recently accused Canada of “dumping” low-priced exports into U.S. markets using the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Trudeau in turn criticized his U.S. counterpart for “turning inward” from its significant allies and trading partners.

"There are tremendous opportunities for countries like Canada and Ireland, at a time where perhaps our significant allies and trading partners in the case of both the U.S. and the U.K. are turning inward or at least turning into a different direction," Trudeau said during a press conference in Ireland this week.

The two leaders disagree on issues ranging immigration and climate change.

Trudeau said he was “deeply disappointed” after Trump announced his decision to remove the U.S. from the Paris climate agreement.

Despite their disagreements, Trump did wish Trudeau a happy Canada Day last week, referring to the Canadian leader as his “new found friend.”