US vetoes UN resolution offering 'protection' for Palestinians

US vetoes UN resolution offering 'protection' for Palestinians
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Nikki HaleyNimrata (Nikki) HaleyAnti-Trump Republicans better look out — voters might send you packing US expected to withdraw from UN Human Rights Council: report UN approves resolution blaming Israel for Gaza violence MORE, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations (U.N.), vetoed an Arab-backed Security Council resolution on Friday that sought to offer "international protection" for Palestinian civilians. 

The resolution, introduced by Kuwait, was intended to respond to the escalation of violence in Gaza last month during protests at the border with Israel. Dozens of Palestinians were killed by Israeli security forces, who argue that they were trying to defend the border.

Haley blasted the Kuwaiti-drafted resolution on Friday, calling it "grossly one-sided" and arguing that it failed to place blame on Hamas for inciting the deadly protests.

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"It is resolutions like this one that undermine the U.N.’s credibility in dealing with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict," she said shortly before the vote.

"Because this resolution is wildly inaccurate in its characterization of recent events in Gaza, and because it would harm any efforts towards peace, the United States will oppose it and will veto it if necessary."

In a subsequent statement, Haley said the resolution, which secured 10 votes on the 15-member Security Council, proved what she called the U.N.'s anti-Israel bias. 

"Further proof was not needed, but it is now completely clear that the U.N. is hopelessly biased against Israel,” she said.

The U.S. is one of five permanent members of the Security Council, allowing it to unilaterally veto any resolution.

A U.S.-drafted resolution condemning Hamas for the violence in Gaza also failed on Friday, with only Haley voting in favor of it.

More than 120 Palestinians have been killed at the border between Gaza and Israel since protests began in March. Israeli officials have argued that they have a right to use deadly force to stop protesters from scaling the fence that separates Gaza and Israel.