Classified Israeli report raises questions about Trump-Kim summit: report

Israel's foreign ministry reportedly raised questions in a recent classified report about President TrumpDonald John TrumpAl Gore: Trump has had 'less of an impact on environment so far than I feared' Trump claims tapes of him saying the 'n-word' don't exist Trump wanted to require staffers to get permission before writing books: report MORE's upbeat assessment of his Tuesday summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. 

Axios reported Thursday that the Israeli report makes a point of noting that a brief document signed by Trump and Kim fails to commit the North to "full, verifiable, irreversible denuclearization," which has long been Washington's position.

Instead, the agreement calls for "complete denuclearization." Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump heads to New York to shore-up GOP districts Turkish president: US set deadline to release detained pastor Pompeo discusses new sanctions in call with Russian counterpart MORE told reporters on Wednesday, however, that the agreement still commits the North to the total nuclear disarmament demanded by the U.S.

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The report from the Israeli foreign ministry also raised questions about Trump's decision to suspend joint military drills with South Korea after his meeting with Kim. 

The announcement marked a dramatic reversal from the United States's past rejection of China's "freeze-for-freeze" proposal, which called for an end to the military exercises in exchange for a cease to the North's weapons tests.

"Regardless of the smiles in the summit many in Japan, South Korea and the U.S. Congress doubt that North Korea is sincere in its intentions," the Israeli report stated, according to Axios, which said it obtained a copy of the report. "Our assessment is that regardless of President Trump's statements about quick changes that are expected in North Korean policy, the road to real and substantive change, if it ever happens, will be long and slow."

Trump has touted his meeting with Kim as a historic move that significantly lessened tensions with Pyongyang. On Wednesday, he declared that the North is no longer a nuclear threat. 

But others have raised questions about that claim, pointing to the lack of substance in the agreement signed Tuesday. The document committed the U.S. to unspecified security guarantees for North Korea in exchange for the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.

Many have noted that Pyongyang has vowed in the past to denuclearize but has broken that promise repeatedly.

Retired Adm. Harry Harris, Trump's pick to serve as ambassador to South Korea, challenged Trump's claim that North Korea no longer poses a nuclear threat to the world, saying Thursday that "we have to continue to worry about that."